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2018 Quality in Construction

“The asphalt pavement industry is committed to building high-quality projects that deliver superior performance to the traveling public. All contractors’ projects earning a Quality in Construction award are measured against best practices designed to live up to that commitment,” said 2018 NAPA Chairman Craig Parker. 

For 2018, 283 projects were honored with a Quality in Construction Award. One hudnred ten of the projects were singled out for their use of sustainable construction practices, such as incorporating reclaimed and recycled materials and using warm-mix asphalt.

 

Details on the winners and their projects follow.

 

2014QICCollage 

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

Colorado

Connecticut

Florida

Georgia

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Missouri

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

South Carolina

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia 

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin       

 


ALABAMA

Dunn Construction Co. Inc. of Birmingham, Ala.
  • Work on the resurfacing of the CSXT-TSDI car yard parking lot in Alabama. The project required extensive scheduling; company managers had to coordinate with the railroad to offload more than 500 cars per day. Dunn Construction incorporated sustainable paving practices into the job, using the maximum allowable reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes and adding steel slag and blast furnace slag into the wearing surface mixes.
  • Mill and overlay of Highway 269 in Jefferson County. The company was the prime contractor; it teamed with Mill It Up, a DBE contractor, which performed the planing work. With careful planning, the company was able to maximize production and complete the project ahead of schedule. Dunn Construction Co. also used sustainable paving practices, incorporating the maximum allowable reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes
  • I-459 in Hoover, Ala., by using multiple paving crews and partnering with Midsouth Paving to meet phase completion goals and maximize production. The base and binder mixes used 25 to 35 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement while 20 percent was used in the surface mix designs, the maximum allowable usage. Other recycled products used in the mixes were steel slag and blast surface slag. Finally, asphalt foamers were used at the plant to help improve asphalt coating.
  • Mill and overlay of I-459 in Hoover, Ala. The company partnered with Midsouth Paving to help achieve timeline and production goals, which proved a success for both companies. A highly modified polymer mix design with a 76-22E Performance Grade liquid asphalt binder was used, which required fast-paced work on the part of all crews due to the short-lived shelf life of the polymer placement over the milled workspace.
Midsouth Paving Inc., A CRH Co., of Birmingham, Ala.
  • Work on CR 26 and 45 in Lowndes, Alabama. The project consisted of patching, leveling and overlaying the existing roadway.

 

Midsouth Paving Inc., A CRH Co., of Dothan, Ala.
  • Mill and overlay of SH 10 in Abbeville, Alabama. The company had to remove old concrete slabs (overlaid with asphalt) from one section of the project before rebuilding that area. Traffic control and problems with aging utilities also complicated work. Midsouth Paving used the maximum allowed amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes to help reduce its carbon footprint.
  • Work on SH 431 in Henry County, Alabama. The company performed most of the paving on this main route to Florida's beaches during the peak of spring break travel. Despite motorists' speeding in the construction zone, Midsouth Paving completed the job safely and on time. It also used sustainable paving practices, incorporating the maximum 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes.
  • Mill and overlay of SH 95 in Henry and Barbour Counties in Alabama. Challenges included a hilly, curvy road that carries heavy traffic because of its proximity to Lake Eufaula. Midsouth Paving Inc. had to devote as many people to traffic control duties as it did to the roadway resurfacing. The company also used sustainable paving practices, maximizing the use of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes to reduce the use of virgin aggregates and greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Work on SR 1 in Houston County, Alabama. The road varied from a two-lane road to an undivided four-lane road within a very short distance, so the challenge for Midsouth Paving was to meet production goals and maintain traffic. It did so by doing the work in sections. Midsouth Paving used sustainable paving practices, incorporating 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mix.
Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Ariton, Ala.
  • Work on SH 239 in Bullock County, Alabama. The company micro-milled the road, widened it, and placed two courses of asphalt pavement.
  • Work on SH 52 in Hartford, Alabama. The company micromilled and widened the road, spot leveled it, and placed a surface layer.
  • Work on SH 92 in Dale County, Alabama. The company micro-milled the road then placed an asphalt overlay.
Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Huntsville, Ala.
  • Work on 5.31 miles of SR 36 in Morgan County, Alabama. The company milled, leveled, and resurfaced the road, which had three super-elevated curves that required leveling.
Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Montgomery, Ala.
  • Work on SR 111 in Elmore County, Alabama. The company milled the existing road, widened it by 2 feet to improve its safety, and placed a 1.5-inch asphalt surface with aggregate shoulders. The road was reconstructed under traffic through multiple jurisdictions and completed on time and without incident. Wiregrass Construction Co. used warm-mix asphalt technology for the project and incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in all of the project mixes.
  • Work on CR 2 and 37 in Montgomery County, Alabama. The company used superpave asphalt mixes to resurface two roads.
Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Pelham, Ala.
  • Work on US 31 in Shelby County, Alabama. Working at night, under traffic, the company milled the existing pavement and placed a new 1.5-inch surface layer on the road. It also renovated a bridge and installed new loop wire. Wiregrass Construction Co. included sustainable paving practices in the project, using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes.
  • Work on its work on CR 82 in Chilton County. The company widened the road by two feet to improve safety, patched existing pavement, leveled the roadway, and then placed a surface overlay. The project included sustainable paving practices such as the use of warm-mix asphalt technology and the inclusion of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes.
  • Work on US 31 in Chilton County, Alabama. The company widened 6.3 miles of the road by 2 feet to improve its safety, then micro milled, patched, and leveled it before placing a surface overlay course of asphalt. Wiregrass Construction Co. used sustainable paving practices, including warm- mix asphalt technology and the inclusion of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes.
Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Red Level, Ala.
  • Work on overlay of Highway 134 in Covington and Coffee Counties, Alabama. Despite cold January temperatures and a 30 to 40-minute distance between the plant and the jobsite, the company produced a pavement with excellent density and rideability. The asphalt mixes for the project included the maximum allowable amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement.
  • Overlay of Highway 141 in Coffee County, Alabama. The company widened the road and then laid a 1.5-inch layer of superpave asphalt. It used 35 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the widening mix and 20 percent RAP in the surface and surface widening courses.
  • Mill and overlay of Highway 29 in Crenshaw County, Alabama. The company micro-milled the pavement, then placed three courses of asphalt pavement, ending with a 1.5-inch surface course. Wiregrass Construction Co. used the maximum amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) allowed.
  • Overlay of Highway 331 in Crenshaw County, Alabama. The company widened the road and then placed a 1.5-inch surface course of asphalt mix. Since it is a heavily-traveled beach route, Wiregrass Construction Co. had to keep traffic flowing while maintaining production. The company used the maximum allowable amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement.

 

ALASKA

Granite Construction Co., Alaska Branch
  • Work on Brayton Drive in Anchorage, Alaska. The company repaired and planed sections of the pavement, then milled and overlaid it. It also installed new handicap ramps, guardrail, signing, and striping. The company worked with the Alaska Department of Transportation to develop a traffic phasing plan that enabled it to produce a smooth, high-quality asphalt pavement ahead of schedule and with minimum disruption to motorists.
  • 10-mile stretch of the Glenn Highway in Anchorage, Alaska. More than 50,000 vehicles travel this northbound route out of Anchorage each day. The traffic volume, combined with harsh Alaskan winters, had caused the pavement to rut and pot hole. The three-lane highway, both northbound and southbound portions, was milled and paved during a three-month period. Efficient traffic and safety control plans and use of an infrared joint heater helped achieve smooth joints and top-notch density and smoothness scores.

 

ARIZONA

Granite Construction Co. of Tucson, Ariz.
  • Mill and overlay of Duval Mine Road in Sahuarita, Arizona. The company recommended a better performing and longer-lasting asphalt mix for the project than the one the town originally planned to use.

ARKANSAS

Delta Asphalt of Arkansas Inc.
  • Overlay of SH 135 in Greene County, Arkansas. To ensure consistent compaction, the company used intelligent compaction technology, which mapped roller passes with GPS. It also monitored pavement temperature with infrared scanners and measured the pavement density. Delta Cos. employed sustainable paving practices on the project, using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and a warm foaming mix asphalt that helps reduce greenhouse emissions.
  • Overlay of sections of SH 150 and SH 181 in Mississippi County, Arkansas. The company widened the pavements and then placed 2 inches of superpave asphalt as an overlay. It used an intelligent compaction system on the rollers to achieve a better pavement density. Delta Cos. incorporated sustainable paving practices into this project, using 15 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and 15 percent steel slag in the mixes. It also used a warm-mix asphalt foaming system, which reduces energy usage and emissions.
  • Work on 7.45 miles of SH 367 in White County, Arkansas. The company widened the shoulders of the road and then placed 2 inches of superpave on the entire roadway. It used intelligent compaction technology to ensure a smooth, dense pavement that will resist cracking and rutting for years to come. Delta Cos. Inc. incorporated sustainable paving practices into the project, adding 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) to the mixes and using warm-mix asphalt technology which saves energy and reduces emissions.
  • Widening the shoulders and placing a 3-inch overlay on two sections of county roads in Faulkner County, Arkansas. To ensure consistent compaction, the company used intelligent compaction technology, which mapped roller passes with GPS. It also monitored pavement temperature with infrared scanners and measured the pavement density. Delta Cos. employed sustainable paving practices on the project, using 22 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes and a warm foaming mix asphalt that helps reduce greenhouse emissions.
Rogers Group Inc. of Conway, Ark.
  • Work on Highway 5 in White County, Arkansas. Project challenges included variable land widths through business areas and very congested traffic that required the company to mill and pave the road at night.
  • Work on Highways 64 and 67B in White County, Arkansas. This mill and fill project restored a section of a major east-west route in central Arkansas. The company worked at night to avoid traffic congestion during school hours.

 

CALIFORNIA

 

Granite Construction Co. of Buellton, Calif.
  • Work on Santa Barbara Municipal Airport Runway 7-25. The project consisted of a five-inch cold plane of the existing surface on the main runway, followed by a variable thickness leveling course. Due to the grade requirements of the two paving courses, 3D Universal Total Station (UTS) paving equipment was used. The daily setup and placement required proper planning to ensure uninterrupted and continuous operation throughout the shift and 3D models were regularly updated to ensure proper grades were obtained.
  • Widening of SR 14/178 in Indian Wells, Calif. Consistent high winds put pressure on the crews to carefully manage the quality of the asphalt placement each day. The asphalt plant was located 95 miles from the construction site, and Granite Construction regularly averaged 50 to 60 trucks for hauling. Meetings were held daily to coordinate both weather and production plans.
Granite Construction Co. of Fresno, Calif.
  • I-5 project in Kings County, Calif. The existing roadway was milled down to the original concrete pavement. Concrete pavement panels were removed and replaced with more than 100,000 tons of hot-mix asphalt and more than 46,000 tons of rubberized hot-mix asphalt. The concrete panels had to be removed and repaved within five working days of milling. All work was performed at night.
Granite Construction Co. of Indio, Calif.
  • I-10 pavement rehabilitation in Riverside County, Calif. This highway is one of the busiest in the state of California, connecting Los Angeles with the rest of the country. Workers dealt with high traffic volume in each direction, including 36 percent truck traffic. This project was large in scope to include 1.6 million square yards of asphalt cold planing and then placement of 521,000 tons of hot asphalt mix and 177,000 tons of rubberized hot asphalt mix. The project was completed ahead of schedule, even with the large asphalt tonnage used.
Granite Construction Co. of Sacramento, Calif.
  • Work on the mill and overlay of SH 50 in Sacramento County, California. The company used rubberized asphalt binder in both of the asphalt mixes for the project, conserving the use of natural resources.
Granite Construction Co. of Watsonville, Calif.
  • San Diego International Airport Runway 9/27, which was rehabilitated using almost 36,000 tons of 1-inch Superpave PG 76-22PM asphalt. The runway could only be closed from 12:01-5 a.m., with crews starting prep work after the last plane landed. The runway was milled to a 3-inch depth and then a cleanup crew followed the milling operation. This allowed for only two hours of paving each night, but crews were able to achieve an average of 400 tons per hour. The 22-foot lane width runway was completed in 41 shifts with no issues.

 

 

COLORADO

The Brannan Sand & Gravel Co. of Denver, Colo.
  • Work on various roads in The Preserve in Greenwood Village, Colorado. The company planned the work carefully and kept homeowners in the subdivision updated with paving plans and alternate travel routes. The Brannan Sand & Gravel Co. patched, milled, and placed an overlay on these roads.

 

Four Corners Materials, A CRH Co. of Bayfield, Colo.
  • Work on overlay of US 160 in La Plata County, Colorado. The company's crews worked at night, in 12-hour shifts, to minimize impact to local and tourist traffic on this high-volume highway. Four Corners Materials used sustainable paving practices, incorporating the maximum allowable amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes to reduce the use of virgin aggregates.

 

Martin Marietta of Fort Collins, Colo.
  • Mill and overlay of various roads in Fort Collins, Colorado. The company placed an overlay on the roads, improving and protecting the pavements' infrastructures. Martin Marietta used 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, a sustainable paving practice that saved more than 6,000 tons of material. The pavement work was funded through the Keep Fort Collins Great tax initiative.
  • Various Roads project in Greeley, Colo. This mill-and-overlay work was part of the 2018 Keep Greeley Moving program, a tax initiative the residents funded for road maintenance and improvements. A 1-inch leveling course was laid prior to a 2.5-inch thick surface overlay. In all, more than 63,000 tons of asphalt was placed with 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement used in each mix design.
Martin Marietta of Lakewood, Colo.
  • Work on Fall River Road in Dumont, Colorado. The project included removal of the existing asphalt from 2.4 miles of road, drainage improvements, subgrade work, elevation corrections, and paving.
  • Work on the Westmoor Technology Park parking lot in Westminster, Colorado. The parking lot was badly deteriorated, so the company milled it out full depth and then reprocessed the subgrade to provide a solid foundation for a new pavement.
  • Overlay of White Deer Drive and Elkhorn Streets in Littleton, Colorado. The company performed the work for the White Deer Valley Homeowners Association. Since the HOA did not have the budget to completely reconstruct some failing roads, Martin Marietta did an overlay with a glass pave fabric under the hot-mix asphalt to increase the longevity of the pavement.
United Cos., A CRH Co., of Grand Junction, Colo.
  • Work on Rim Rock Drive at Colorado National Monument in Grand Junction, Colorado. The project included the rubblization and asphalt overlay of the road, which has many curves and a steep elevation gain. The company worked with the Federal Highway Administration to resolve any paving issues, producing a smooth, high-quality pavement on schedule.
  • Work on SH 133 in Delta and Gunnison Counties, Colorado. The company reconditioned the top 2 inches of pavement using a cold bituminous pavement recycling process, then placed 2 inches of new asphalt pavement. United Cos. incorporated 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes.
  • Work on 12 miles of SH 139 in Grand Junction, Colorado. The company reconstructed the road using a heater-refire process, then placed a 1 ½-inch asphalt surface.
  • Work on US 40 in Steamboat, Colorado. The company milled the west side of Rabbit Ears Pass and repaired several sections before placing a 2-inch overlay. It also replaced the culvert and guardrail.

 

DELAWARE

Allan Myers of Dover, Del.
  • US 113 in Newark, Md. This three-phase project used more than 91,000 tons of asphalt to include construction of a new two-lane full-depth highway built adjacent to the existing highway. Once this new section was built, traffic was moved to the newly constructed lanes while the existing roadway was milled, widened, and leveled. The final phase of construction was adding a final overlay and opening the dualized highway with two lanes traveling in each direction.
  • US 113 in Newark, Md. This three-phase project used more than 91,000 tons of asphalt to include construction of a new two-lane full-depth highway built adjacent to the existing highway. Once this new section was built, traffic was moved to the newly constructed lanes while the existing roadway was milled, widened, and leveled. The final phase of construction was adding a final overlay and opening the dualized highway with two lanes traveling in each direction.
  • Mill and overlay of DE 896 in Bear, Delaware. Through proper scheduling and planning, the company completed the project safely and ahead of schedule. Allan Myers had crews come up from its southern Delaware region and worked with its Maryland asphalt plants to maximize daily the amount of asphalt tonnage.

 

FLORIDA

Ajax Paving Industries of Florida of North Venice, Fla.
  • Work on Bee Ridge Road in Sarasota County, Florida. The project included reconstruction of some areas of asphalt base, new construction, milling, and overlay. Challenges included tying the reconstructed sections of pavement back into the existing roadway, correcting the cross slope of the road, and working at night.
  • Page Field Airport Runway 5-23 in Ft. Myers, Fla. Strict measures were taken to follow the airport's guidelines regarding security clearances, maintenance of airport traffic, and dust and debris control. Runway 5-23 received a 4-inch mill and fresh overlay to complete this project ahead of schedule and well within budget.
  • Work on SR 31 in Lee County, Florida. The project included new construction, widening, milling, and overlay of the road. The company worked closely with Peoples Gas during the project, supplying protective sheeting to shield a gas main during the installation of a new storm sewer.
  • Work on I-75 in Manatee County, Florida. The project included the mill and overlay of I-75 and the reconstruction of the ramps and roadway (CR 683) at exit 229. The company, which used a developmental specification for the internal roughness index, produced a smooth, high-quality roadway that earned a bonus for its rideability.
  • Page Field Airport Runway 13-31 in Ft. Myers, Fla, which contained dual-crossing runways and taxiways. Crews performed a 4-inch mill and overlay on Runway 13-31 and new taxiways were constructed.
  • Venice Airport Parking Aprons reconstruction project at Venice Airport, Fla. This was a collaborative effort that resulted in a large number of change orders, which benefitted the owner and laid the groundwork for future airport endeavors – all while staying within budget. The 4-inch surface overlay was a 12.5mm P-401 mix and more than 14,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete the project.
CWR Contracting Inc. of Freeport, Fla.
  • Mill and overlay of SR 10 in Carville, Florida. The company paid strict attention to best management practices while working on this rural two-lane road. CWR Contracting produced a high-quality road with little disruption to traffic. It used a material transfer vehicle and sonic skis to build a smooth pavement for area motorists.
  • Mill and overlay of SR 10 in Crestview, Florida. The company worked at night between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. to minimize disruption to traffic and to businesses on this heavily-traveled, four-lane road. CWR Contracting used a material transfer vehicle and sonic skis to produce a smooth, high-quality pavement.

 

CWR Contracting Inc. of Tallahassee, Fla.
  • Work on SR 10 in Jefferson County, Florida. The company worked with the Florida Department of Transportation on this milling and overlay project
  • Work on SR 267 in Gadsden County, Florida. The company used a high-polymer binder in the asphalt mixes to prevent rutting and cracking on this high-traffic roadway.
  • Work on SR 391 in Panama City, Florida. Using a high polymer asphalt mix to reduce cracking and rutting, the company milled the road and then placed an overlay.
CWR Contracting Inc. of Wildwood, Fla.
  • Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport Taxiway B project. The phasing of this reconstruction project required exact planning to help minimize the impact to airport travelers. In all, 4,970 tons of asphalt was used
Preferred Materials Inc., A CRH Co. of Fort Myers, Fla.
  • Work on SR 35 in Charlotte County, Florida. To increase crack and rut resistance, the company used a high polymer binder in both the structural and friction asphalt mixes.
  • Work on SR 45 in Sarasota County, Florida. The company's biggest challenge was the unearthing of an unknown buried drainage culvert in the middle of the downtown portion of the project.
Preferred Materials Inc., A CRH Co. of Jacksonville, Fla.
  • Work on Beaver Street in Duval County, Florida. The company milled 3 inches from the road, then placed a 1.5-inch lift of structural asphalt followed by a 1.5-inch lift of asphalt friction course. The project's challenges included nighttime work restrictions and the need to maintain business and residential traffic during construction. Preferred Materials Inc. used 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes.
  • Work on Emerson Street in Duval County, Florida. The company milled and then paved just over 1 mile of urban, four-lane road with curb and gutter. Preferred Materials Inc. used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes to reduce the need for virgin aggregates and binders and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  • I-75 in Gainesville, Fla, which involved milling, structural and friction work on 6.5 miles of the 6-lane mainline area. Other modifications included ramp widening of a southbound exit and pavement reconstruction at overpass bridge approaches. The inside and outside shoulders of the mainline were also milled and resurfaced, while several sections of the overall project contained varying mill and asphalt depths.
  • Work on SR 116/Wonderwood Connector in Duval County, Florida. The company milled and then paved just over 1 mile of urban, four-lane road with curb and gutter. Preferred Materials Inc. used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes to conserve natural resources and reduce the need for virgin aggregates and binders.
  • Work on SR 55/US 221 in Perry, Florida. The company milled and paved approximately 2 miles of urban, two-lane road and built curb and gutter sections. It partnered with the City of Perry to resolve some unforeseen utility issues. Preferred Materials Inc. used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes to conserve natural resources and reduce the need for virgin aggregates and binders.

 

Preferred Materials Inc., A CRH Co. of Orlando, Fla.
  • Orlando Melbourne International Airport Runway 9R-27L project. Two crews paved in tandem during this rehabilitation project, with more than 3,000 tons of asphalt placed each day during the 70-day runway closure. In all, 91,000 tons of asphalt was used to place the leveling, binder, and surface courses.
  • Work on SR 408 in Orange County, Florida. The project included milling and resurfacing on some sections and widening and construction on others. Strong partnerships and communication were used to maintain traffic on this urban roadway.
  • Work on SR 408 in Orlando, Florida. The company milled the road, then placed a 1 ½-inch binder course and a 1 ½-inch surface course of asphalt.

 

Preferred Materials Inc., A CRH Co. of Tampa, Fla.
  • Work on SR 55 in Pinellas County, Florida. Maintaining pedestrian traffic during the ADA phase of the project was challenging; the team had to develop temporary solutions to maintain safe traffic flow on a daily basis.
  • Mill and overlay of SR 60 in Hillsborough County, Florida. The company had to overcome extensive challenges: a road foundation that is more than a century old and made of brick; forgotten buried utilities, including an antique drainage system; and heavy pedestrian, bicycle and vehicle traffic. The company partnered with the Florida Department of Transportation to resolve unforeseen conditions.

 

Ranger Construction Industries Inc. of West Palm Beach, Fla.
  • Work on the Military Trail in Palm Beach County, Florida. The project included deep milling, asphalt replacement, and grout injection to remedy deficient roadway sections. The company overcame many challenges, including short working windows, nighttime construction, and heavy vehicle and pedestrian traffic.
  • Mill and overlay of US 27 in Broward County, Florida. Project challenges included school zones, limited work hours, restraints on lane closures, high traffic volumes, and poor visibility because of fog during night paving.
Ranger Construction Industries of Winter Garden, Fla.
  • Florida Turnpike project in Indian River and Okeechobee Counties. Deep milling followed by multiple courses meant paying particular attention to scheduling, as the job needed to be completed in one shift each day and the road reopened to traffic.
  • SR 70 in Okeechobee, Fla. The company was required to mill and overlay the westbound lanes of the road while constructing eastbound lanes. More than 70,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete the project.
  • Widening of US 27 in Clermont, Fla. This project took place in a rural area of Florida and involved adding lanes, starting with the first phase of breaking ground and curb work. A cost savings initiative modified the traffic phasing to such a degree that it resulted in substantial cost savings and allowed the project to be finished 151 days ahead of allowable contract time.
  • Work on US 441 in Okeechobee County, Florida. The company milled the road and then placed an overlay. It was one of the first projects in the state to use a high polymer binder for the asphalt mixes, which improves the pavement's resistance to rutting and cracking.


GEORGIA

C. W. Matthews Contracting Co. Inc. of Marietta, Ga.
  • Overlay of SR 317 in Suwanee, Georgia. Due to heavy traffic, the existing road had a significant amount of distress and damage. With careful workmanship and consistent quality control, the company laid a 3.5-inch overlay that improved the smoothness of the pavement by 63 percent. C.W. Matthews used sustainable construction practices, integrating 40 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes.
  • Mill and overlay of SR 74 in Monroe County, Georgia. Although the road carries relatively light traffic, 16 percent of that volume is trucks. The company used sustainable construction practices for the overlay, incorporating 25 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes to reduce the use of virgin aggregate.
R.B. Baker Construction, division of Reeves Construction Co. of Garden City, Ga.
  • I-95 project in Chatham and Effingham Counties in Georgia. The roadwork included 76 lane miles of micro milling, variable depth milling, fog sealing, replacement of bridge approach slabs, and the placement of five different mixtures. The existing pavement was severely deteriorated and rutted, which challenged the planning and completion phases of the project. Foamed asphalt technology was used on the asphalt during the mixing process, with all construction taking place overnight and meeting strict IRI requirements.
Reeves Construction Co. of Macon, Ga.
  • Work on SR 11 in Ben Hill County, Georgia. The project consisted of 8.2 miles of milling, resurfacing, and shoulder reconstruction. The company used sustainable paving practices, incorporating 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes. Using continuous paving operations, Reeves Construction Co. achieved a 65 percent improvement in the road's smoothness.
  • Overlay of SR 112 in Pulaski County, Georgia. The work included the leveling and resurfacing of the existing pavement. The company used a material transfer vehicle to ensure the continuity of paving operations, producing a pavement of excellent density. It incorporated sustainable paving practices, including the use of 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and warm-mix asphalt. Reeves Construction won an award from the Georgia Department of Transportation for this pavement, which was the smoothest produced in the state in FY 2018.
  • Work on leveling and resurfacing of 8.2 miles of SR 112 in Turner County, Georgia. The company used a material transfer vehicle during paving to achieve a consistent and dense pavement. It incorporated green paving practices into the project, reducing emissions, and preserving virgin materials by using 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mix and using warm mix foaming technology. Reeves Construction Co. achieved a 60 percent improvement in the pavement's smoothness.
  • Work on SR 300 in Crisp County, Georgia. The company leveled and resurfaced the existing pavement, producing a high-quality asphalt road. The pavement's smoothness improved by more than 50 percent over the previous roadway. Reeves Construction Co. used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes and warm-mix foaming technology.

 
IDAHO

Idaho Materials & Construction, A CRH Co. of Nampa, Idaho
  • Work on SH 69 in Meridian, Idaho. The company worked at night on this overlay project, which had short paving windows to limit delays for commuters and other motorists. Idaho Materials & Construction partnered with several subcontractors on the installation of pedestrian ramps, traffic signals, concrete dividers, and utilities. The company used 36 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mix.
Knife River Corp., Southern Idaho Division of Boise, Idaho
  • US 12 mill-and-overlay project in Powell, Idaho. The project - spread out over a 60-mile section in a rural area – was sandwiched between an unseasonably cool and rainy spring and the fall paving season. Knife River combined phases to complete the 150,000-ton project on time. Recycled asphalt from project millings was used in the final mix, while maintaining quality smoothness standards throughout the process.
Poe Asphalt Paving Inc. of Lewiston, Idaho
  • Work on US 95 in Benewah County, Idaho. Using multiple crews over the 9-mile project, the company rehabilitated the roadway by overlaying the existing pavement with superpave asphalt mix. It also updated the guardrails. Poe Asphalt Paving Inc. used sustainable paving practices, incorporating 18 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes.
Poe Asphalt Paving Inc. of Post Falls, Idaho
  • Work on Argonne Road in Spokane County, Washington. The project included the installation of guardrail, grading, shaping, different-depth milling, and the placement of several hot-mix asphalt layers. The company worked at night to limit the disruption to travelers. Poe Asphalt incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes. This sustainable paving approach cut greenhouse gas emissions, reduced project costs and required less virgin aggregate.
  • Work on Bayview Road in Bonner County, Idaho. The company rubblized the old roadway, regraded and reshaped the road, then placed a new aggregate base followed by a smooth asphalt surface course. Poe Asphalt used green paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes.

 

ILLINOIS

Southern Illinois Asphalt Co. Inc. 
  • Mill and overlay of IL 15 in downtown Mt. Vernon in Jefferson County, Illinois. There are numerous manholes and utilities that run through this heavily traveled road, which has numerous cross streets. Delta Companies used oscillating rollers to produce a smooth, high-quality asphalt pavement.
  • Work on 8.6 miles of Tunnel Hill Road in Johnson County, Illinois. For this overlay project, the company had to do a substantial amount of crown and super-elevation correction, placing asphalt courses of varying thicknesse

 

INDIANA

Brooks Construction Co. of Fort Wayne, Ind.
  • Work on 7.8 miles of US 24 in Allen County, Indiana. The project included the construction of new turn lanes to improve the safety of the road. The company minimized traffic disruption by working on one side of the highway at a time. Brooks Construction Co. patched and milled the existing pavement, then placed 1.5 inches of hot-mix asphalt on its surface using a material transfer vehicle and three rollers to produce a smooth, dense road surface.
  • Reconstruction of approximately 5 miles of US 30 in Whitley County, Indiana. In addition to paving the road with hot-mix asphalt, the company installed new storm sewer, wall, curb and gutter, concrete approaches, sidewalk, and streetlights. In one area, the road was raised by 11 feet to eliminate flooding problems. The work was done in three phases to minimize disruption to traffic.
E&B Paving Inc. of Anderson, Ind.
  • Reconstruction of I-65 in Clark County, Ind. The company was contracted to remove the existing concrete pavement, perform soil stabilization, replace the existing drainage, and reconstruct it all with 16 inches of asphalt. Challenges to the timeline included demanding traffic maintenance, limited lane closures, and maintaining worker safety in a busy construction zone.
E&B Paving Inc. of Bloomington, Ind.
  • I-69 in Bloomington, Ind, a project that involved converting the existing four-lane SR37 into interstate standards to form the new I-69. A total of 21 miles of mainline interstate and 14 miles of access roads were constructed. In addition, four new interchanges, several new multi-use paths and roundabouts were part of the project. Much of the project's paving - 856,000 tons of asphalt – took place at night to help ensure safety. Various methods were used to control traffic flow, such as crossovers, zipper merge tapers, and multi-phasing.
  • Mill and overlay of SR 57 in Pike and Gibson Counties, Indiana. This roadway is a rural two-lane highway that has considerable truck traffic from coal mines and farms. The company completed the work one lane at a time, keeping work zones as short as possible to minimize delays to the traveling public. E&B Paving incorporated sustainable paving practices into the project, using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes to reduce the use of virgin aggregates.
J.H. Rudolph & Co. Inc., A CRH Co. of Evansville, Ind.
  • Mill and overlay of SR 68 in Gibson County, Indiana. The company had to perform major patching on the road, which was severely rutted and cracked due to the heavy agricultural traffic that uses it. J.H. Rudolph & Co. worked with the Indiana Department of Transportation to minimize the impact of the project on travelers.
Milestone Contractors LP of Indianapolis, Ind.
  • I-69 project in Fishers, Ind. The project encompassed adding a third lane to I-69 and reconstructing Exit 210's interchange to improve traffic flow. The interchange was configured as a double crossover diamond and was able to remain open during construction. More than 45,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete the work.
  • Work on I-74 in Marion County. The company worked at night, patching, milling and resurfacing the road. The final surface was a stone mix asphalt that included steel slag. Although the existing pavement was rough, the company produced a smooth, dense, high-quality pavement.
  • Construction of Linville Way in Johnson County, Indiana. The company did cement stabilization of the soil and installed underdrains then placed 8 inches of compacted aggregates and 9 inches of asphalt.
Walsh & Kelly Inc. of Griffith, Ind.
  • US 31 project in South Bend, Ind. Just over 50,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete a mill-and-overlay job by crews dedicated to the project and interested in producing a quality pavement. The 3-inch binder course used 32,000 tons of asphalt, followed by the 1.5-inch blast furnace slag surface lift that used 13,000 tons. Almost 5,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete shoulder work.
  • I-65 construction in Crown Point, Ind. The company was a paving subcontractor on the project, working closely with other contractors to handle requirements such as the fine grading of the aggregate base and lane closures. The full length of the job was 7.6 miles with two bridges, which impeded available paving length each night when the lane closures took place. Crews used innovative techniques, such as using a propane torch to keep the asphalt hot prior to placement.

IOWA


L.L. Pelling Co. Inc. of North Liberty, Iowa
  • Work on F-46 in Williamsburg, Iowa. The project involved the widening and overlay of an existing concrete roadway; the company cracked and seated the concrete surface before placing the asphalt overlay. L.L. Pelling Co. used sustainable paving practices, incorporating approximately 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project's asphalt mixes.


KANSAS

APAC-Kansas Inc., A CRH Co. of Hays, Kan.
  • Work on US 160 in Meade and Clark Counties, Kansas. The project consisted of a 1-inch mill, followed by a 1 ½-inch overlay of the road. The company used sustainable building practices, using the millings from the project as reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes. This saved the owner money and reduced the use of virgin aggregates.
APAC-Kansas Inc., Shears Division, A CRH Co. of Hutchinson, Kan.
  • Work on US 50 in Harvey County, Kansas. The company patched an existing concrete road and then placed an asphalt overlay, producing a smooth pavement that has extended the road's service life. APAC-Kansas incorporated many sustainable practices into the project. It included reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in the project mixes, used warm-mix technology and recycled the oil for the asphalt burner.
  • Overlay of US 69 in Linn County, Kansas, a project designed to extend the life of a concrete pavement roadway. The base was a 1-inch reflective cracking interlayer to help prevent failed concrete joints from reflecting through the new surface, which was two lifts of an SR-12.5 mix.
Koss Construction Co. of Topeka, Kan.
  • Reconstruction of the K-7 Highway in Cherokee County, Kan. This 11-mile project was extensive and required two phases, which began in the spring of 2016 and was completed in the fall of 2018. The overall scope involved removing the existing 24-foot wide asphalt highway, regrading, and paving to a 44-foot length to allow for two 12-foot lanes with 10-foot wide shoulders. Many obstacles were met along the way – such as redesign of a box culvert, unstable soil and a buried tire dump.

KENTUCKY

Jim Smith Contracting Co. LLC of Grand Rivers, Ky.
  • I-69 in Graves County, Ky. This western portion of the state witnessed unusually high volumes of rain, delaying construction multiple times throughout the project. Two ramps had to be expanded within a two-week time period to progress to the next phase of the project. The crews decided to use the jersey walls not only as a traffic barrier, but also as a retaining wall to hold back four feet of earth.
  • I-69 construction project in Marshall County, Ky. Almost 138,000 tons of asphalt was used to build 31 new miles of highway, all while keeping existing lanes open. One branch of a clover leaf was removed during the construction project and one acceleration lane was added.
Louisville Paving & Construction Co. of Louisville, Ky.
  • Mill and overlay of I-64 in Shelby County, Kentucky. The company used intelligent compaction technology to achieve a smooth pavement with consistent density for this high-speed, multi-lane interstate. All of the asphalt mix designs for this pavement included close to the maximum allowable reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes.
  • Mill and overlay of Shelbyville Road in Jefferson County, Kentucky. The company incorporated sustainable paving practices into the project, using close to the maximum allowable percentage of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes.
  • US 53 in Lagrange, Ky. This project was new road construction that used immeasurable amounts of additional rock materials than was originally bid. The site was impassable before construction began, so rock investigation could not accurately take place. Many streams coursed through the project, and historical rainfall often delayed construction.
Mountain Enterprises Inc., A CRH Co. of Lexington, Ky.
  • US 460 in Pike County, Ky. This project involved creating 4.1 miles of full depth perpetual pavement with an 11-inch base course and a 1.25-inch surface overlay. This stretch of road is part of a 16-mile corridor in the state under the Appalachian Development Project, designed to minister to neglected regions due to rough topography and the high cost of development.
Rogers Group Inc. of Hopkinsville, Ky.
  • Mill and overlay project on the Campbell Army Airfield Main Runway in Ft. Campbell, Ky. The project specified removing 4 inches of asphalt and repaving with a 2-inch intermediate lift and a 2-inch surface overlay. Stringent specifications were met along the way, such as minimum 20-foot pull widths on both lifts and no transverse joints on the runway. The two lifts on the main runway were placed in 15 consecutive days and used almost 40,000 tons of asphalt.
Scotty's Contracting and Stone LLC of Bowling Green, Ky.
  • Work on 8.7 miles of I-69 in Hopkins County, Kentucky. The company focused on traffic control, safety, and scheduling as it milled and overlaid two sections of this road.
  • Mill and overlay of 3.35 miles of Lincoln Parkway in Larue Count, Kentucky. The company remained focused on traffic control, safety, and scheduling while building a high-quality pavement.


LOUISIANA

Diamond B Construction of Alexandria, La.
  • US 71 mill and overlay in Morrow, La. The existing roadway was old concrete with virtually no cross slope across the travel lanes. The first order of business was to create 2.5 percent slopes across the centerline roadway and 5 percent shoulder slopes. This was achieved through cold planing to help with smoothness and installing leveling asphalt to reach the desired slopes.

 


MARYLAND

Allan Myers of Fallston, Md.
  • Mill and overlay of I-695 in Baltimore County, Maryland. The company did all work at night due to the extremely high traffic volume on this congested roadway. The unusually rainy weather presented challenges, as well. Allan Myers used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) into the project mixes to reduce the use of virgin aggregates.
  • Work on MD 10 in Glen Burnie, Maryland. The work was completed in three sections. When the company determined that one section of the road had unraveling problems, it partnered with the State Highway Administration to develop the solution: a 1-inch leveling course placed on the road directly after milling to lock in the pavement and ensure the safety of the traveling public. The company used the maximum allowed amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes.
  • Mill and overlay of MD 545 in Cecil County, Maryland. Project challenges included a very wet spring that resulted in water continually seeping into the roadway and narrow road sections (including one underpass) that made traffic control difficult. The company used sustainable paving practices, incorporating 40 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into some of the project mixes.
  • Work on US 1 in Prince George's County, Maryland. The company did all the work for this mill and overlay project at night. It used sustainable paving practices, incorporating the maximum allowable amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project's asphalt mixes.
  • Milling and paving of US 40 in Howard County, Maryland. The company did the work at night, overcoming logistical challenges that included a confined two-lane area against the median barrier. Unusually rainy weather added to the difficulty of the job. The company used the maximum allowed reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes.
Francis O. Day Co. Inc. of Rockville, Md.
  • I-95/I-495 resurfacing and interstate safety construction in Prince George's County, Md. The road was milled and filled to a depth of two inches with a 12.5mm stone matrix asphalt mix. More than 52,000 tons of asphalt was used on the project, which received high density and smoothness scores. No manhours were lost and no accidents occurred during construction on this roadway, which receives an annual average daily traffic ratio of more than 191,000 vehicles on I-95 and 223,700 vehicles on I-495, the Capital Beltway.


MASSACHUSETTS

All States Materials Group of Sunderland, Mass.
  • I-91 project in Franklin and Hampshire Counties, Mass. Just over 11 miles of the northbound and southbound lanes was milled and then filled with more than 28,000 tons of an asphalt-rubber open graded friction course as the surface layer. This special porous mix contained a 20 percent 1-inch asphalt-rubber binder. The final pavement received very high test scores, particularly the ride quality with an average IRI below 27.
Brox Industries Inc. of Dracut, Mass.
  • Hanscom Field Runway 11-29 reconstruction in Bedford, Mass. Roughly 40 percent of the runway was milled to a depth of about 4 inches and the remaining 60 percent was milled to varying depths down to the original concrete. This material was then rubblized, with milling, rubblization and paving operations taking place simultaneously.
P.J. Keating Co., a CRH Co. of Lunenburg, Mass.
  • Work on the Atlantis Charter School running track in Fall River, Massaschusetts. The company built the running track with a compacted gravel subbase and two lifts of asphalt pavement topped by a rubberized running surface. The biggest challenge was to construct a pavement that was almost perfectly flat but could also shed water after a rain storm.
  • Work on Bridge and Elm Streets in Dartmouth, Massachusetts. The job took place in the small neighborhood of Pandanram Village, where the residents' and business owners' civic pride meant that the company's work got close scrutiny. P.J. Keating milled and paved the road, producing a smooth, high-quality, asthetically pleasing pavement.
  • Work on the Campanelli Business Park in Bellingham, Massachusetts. The project included paving binder and surface courses at a new state-of-the-art warehouse and distribution facility. The company had to complete the work on an accelerated schedule.
  • Work on Chickering and Donnelly Roads in Spencer, Massachusetts. The project consisted of full depth reclamation and paving on two roads in the town.
  • Work on Cottage Street in Franklin, Massachusetts. The company did a full-depth reclamation of the existing pavement, followed by the repair and replacement of existing drainage structures. Paving from late September to early December, the company produced a smooth, high-quality pavement.
  • Work on the FedEx Ground Sorting and Distribution Facility in Boylston, Massachusetts. In order to have the parking lot ready for the facility's opening in early May, P.J. Keating Co. had to work on a tight schedule and begin paving as soon as the snow had melted and the ground thawed.
  • Micro milling and overlay of 7.25 miles of I-495 in Plymouth County, Mass., the main artery leading to Cape Cod. No construction could take place Friday or Saturday nights during the summer and restrictions were placed other days and times, as well. The surface overlay was an open graded friction course with an asphalt-rubber PG-binder, which required the use of a mobile blending plant. This mobile plant consisted of three interconnected trailer-mounted units and was shared by two facilities. Dismantling, moving and reconfiguring the plant was a one-week process, but P.J. Keating kept all projects on schedule.
  • I-84 mill-and-overlay construction in Sturbridge, Mass. This is a heavily-traveled 7.2-miles stretch of highway linking New York City and Boston. The road was micro milled and then paved with the first course, providing the traveling public a smooth road while roadside drainage work was performed. An open-grade friction course modified with an asphalt-rubber PG binder was chosen for the final wearing course. P.J. Keating used its newly-acquired laser profiler to evaluate milling and paving operations, which helped provide a roadway 50 percent smoother than specified.
  • Full-depth reconstruction of Runway 14-32 at New Bedford Airport in Massachusetts. The runway intersects another major runway at the airport, and P.J. Keating was required to pave this intersection within an 80-hour airport closure. Pavement reclaiming, compacting and fine grading the base, as well as paving the binder and surface course, had to be completed during the closure.
  • Mill and overlay of Route 24 in Berkley and Freetown, Massachusetts. The company micromilled the road, using a high-speed laser profile to measure the smoothness of the milled surface after every shift. The company placed an asphalt-rubber mix on the milled road.
  • Work on the Route 9 and Route 20 Interchange in Northborough, Massachusetts. The project required reconstruction of the heavily-traveled roadway on a tight schedule as well as the use of asphalt-rubber-modified mix as a surface course.
  • Work on various roads in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. The company miled and overlaid two roads; for the others, it fully reconstructed the streeets. P.J. Keating worked closely to minimize the impact of its work on area residents.

 


MICHIGAN

Ajax Paving Industries of Troy, Mich.
  • Chelsea Proving Ground FCA Development Pad in Chelsea, Mich. Roughly 34 acres was used for new construction by Chrysler car engineers to test vehicle dynamics. The project was completed in three lifts, with the base and leveling courses using the same mix. The surface course was a virgin mixture with no reclaimed asphalt pavement allowed.
  • Work on the Ford Motor Arizona Proving Ground Vehicle Dynamics Area in Witmann, Arizona. The company performed pavement crack repair, then micro-milled the 26-acre facility 2 inches before laying a new 2-inch asphalt surface.
  • Work on the General Motors Corp. Milford Proving Ground in Milford, Michigan. The project included cold milling and placement of 5 1/2 inches of hot-mix asphalt; pavement rehabilitation on return loops, installation of 6,000 lineal feet of 9-inch reinforced concrete pavement designed for vehicle testing and new electrical power and technology systems.
  • Work on 2 miles of Woodward Avenue in Oakland County, Michigan. The project consisted of cold milling, joint and crack repair, asphalt overlay of eight lanes of traffic and pavement marking. Traffic control was very important, since of the project's proximity to downtown Birmingham.
Cadillac Asphalt LLC, A CRH Co. of Novi, Mich.
  • Work on Lee Road in Livingston County, Michigan. Working at night on an expedited schedule, the company milled sections of the road and then paved it the same night.
  • Work on Napier Road in Oakland County. The company reconstructed the road, producing a smooth, high-quality pavement that motorists will appreciate for many years.
  • Mill and overlay of Rotunda Drive in Wayne County, Michigan. The company had to work around the four single-lane entrances and exits on the road that could not be closed during construction. It used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in two asphalt mixes.
Michigan Paving & Materials Co., A CRH Co. of Canton, Mich.
  • M-60 overlay in Union City, Mich. This 8.76-mile project consisted of joint repair, wedging, and a two-course overlay of the mainline. The mainline, shoulder leveling, and two courses were paved in echelon to maximize joint density. The existing five-foot shoulders were widened by three feet and overlaid with two courses as well.
Michigan Paving & Materials Co., A CRH Co. of Comstock Park, Mich.
  • M-6 in Kent and Ottawa Counties, Mich. This full-depth perpetual pavement project used the crushed remains of the full-depth concrete removal as an aggregate base. This was followed by lifts of varying asphalt mix types using an echelon paver up to four lanes wide at some points. More than 86,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete the project, which began on July 8, 2017 and was completed in November.
  • Fremont Municipal Airport Runway 18-36 (19-1). This mill-and-overlay project in Fremont, Mich., included runway and taxiway connectors and careful attention to elevation considerations. The existing pavement was milled 2.5 inches and then a two-course overlay was applied. The critical elevations in this project led to the use of robotic automation technology on both the milling and paving operations.
  • Work on 1.5-miles of M-40 in Allegan County, Michigan. The company reconstructed some parts of the road, widened it and then milled it before placing an overlay. The project was performed in multiple phases and had a tight scheduling window to accommodate the public schools located in the work zone. Michigan Paving & Materials Co. incorporated the maximum amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes.
Michigan Paving & Materials Co., A CRH Co. of Jackson, Mich.
  • Work on US 12 in Hillsdale County. The company milled and overlaid the mainline road and the shoulders. The company paved the approaches first, cut across them during milling, creating a clean, straight joint at every approach.
Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Benton Harbor, Mich.
  • Widening and overlay of CR 687 in Van Buren County, Michigan. This road serves as the main connection between Keeler and I-94. The community appreciates the upgrade in the road and the greater room it allows for bicyclists to travel safety to a nearby trail.
  • Reconstruction of Whittaker Street in Berrien County, Michigan. The paving project was part of a downtown beautification project in New Buffalo. Despite working around Memorial Day, the height of the tourist season, Rieth-Riley Construction produced a smooth, high-quality pavement.
Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Charlevoix, Mich.
  • Work on Alba Highway in Antrim County, Michigan. The road is an important artery serving several municipalities in the lake area. Rieth-Riley crushed the road's asphalt base then resurfaced it with hot-mix asphalt, producing a smooth, high-quality pavement.
  • Work on M-32 in Antrim and Charlevoix Counties in Michigan. The company made repairs to the centerline and the shoulders of the road before milling and overlaying it.
  • Work on M-72 in Leelanau County, MIchigan. The company milled and overlaid the road, which is a main route for tourists in the area.
Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Kalamazoo, Mich.
  • Work on US 12 in Branch County, Michigan. The company milled 1-1/8 inches from the road and then placed a 1-½ inch asphalt overlay. It also placed a chip seal on the shoulders.
Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Prudenville, Mich.
  • Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport Runway mill and overlay project in Michigan. FAA requirements for thickness, grade and quality were met by using a 21-foot screed to reduce longitudinal joints and a material transfer vehicle to improve smoothness through continuous paving. The project was divided into three phases to help limit runway closures, with air traffic continuing during two of the three phases of paving operations.
Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Wyoming, Mich.
  • US 131 reconstruction in Kent County, Mich. This was a test project in which the northbound and southbound lanes used different pavement designs, as specified by the Michigan Department of Transportation. Echelon paving with two pavers helped avoid unnecessary longitudinal joints in the base and leveling courses. The final lift consisted of two different mixes and required three-paver echelon paving.


MINNESOTA

Knife River Materials, Northern Minnesota Division of Bemidji, Minn.
  • Work on 12 miles of TH 1 in Red Lake, Minnesota. To ensure that it produced a high-quality pavement, the company monitored the centerline culvert work and the temperature of the pavement as it was being placed.
  • Work on 13.6 miles of CSAH 36 in Nary, Minnesota. Work included milling, full depth reclamation, paving, pavement marking and aggregate shoulders. The company worked with the County on the design so it could mill off less pavement and reclaim more of the base.
  • TH 75 project in Crookston, Minn.The project consisted of grading, bituminous mill-and-overlay, ADA improvements and bridge work. The company worked closely with the Minnesota Department of Transportation to complete construction on schedule.
  • Various Roads in Marshall County, Minn. The company was contracted to mill and overlay three separate roads in the county, 23 miles in all. Each road had a separate mix design and needed to be completed individually. Knife River worked diligently with subcontractors and the county to provide seamless operations and a final ride that pleases the community.
  • Overlay of various roads in Polk County, Minnesota. The company worked closely with the county and with subcontractors to produce 18.6 miles of smooth roadway.
Valley Paving Inc. of Shakopee, Minn.
  • Work on TH 13 in Scott County, Minnesota. Work was originally supposed to take place at night, but Valley Paving partnered with the Minnesota Department of Transportation to complete the job in two weekends.
  • Mill and overlay of TH 50 in Dakota County, Minnesota. The road was very narrow, making it difficult for the company to maintain one lane of traffic and get asphalt delivery trucks to the site in a timely fashion. With careful coordination of paving operations, and using intelligent compaction and a thermal profiler scanner, Valley Paving Inc. produced a smooth-riding pavement.
  • Work on TH 7 in Hennepin County, Minnesota. Although the project originally called for work to be done at night, Valley Paving partnered with the Minnesota Department of Transportation to develop a new milling and paving schedule that allowed lane closures during three weekends. This saved time, improved the quality of the roadway, and made the project safer for both the public and the construction workers.


MISSISSIPPI

APAC-Mississippi Inc., A CRH Co. of Columbus, Miss.
  • US 45 overlay in Clarke County, Miss. The existing road was in very poor condition, and required significant leveling throughout this 18.5-mile long project. To achieve the smoothest ride possible, attention was given to monitoring and managing paver/roller speeds, consistency and minimizing paver/roller stops. The project received high marks, despite the 36-mile haul for trucks to and from the asphalt plant for the final coating of an ultra-thin surface lift.
  • Work on US 49 in Simpson County, Mississippi. Working under very heavy traffic conditions, the company placed an overlay on the road.
  • Work on US 49 in Yazoo and Humphreys Counties, Mississippi. The company partnered with the Mississippi Department of Transportation to increase the amount of HMA leveling.
  • Widening of US 64 in Crittenden County, Arkansas. This 5.73-mile project met many challenges, including the need to reduce the leveling course provision by 50 percent and complete the various phases of construction out of sequence due to weather and inherent subgrade issues. Despite these difficulties, the final pavement received high scores and bonus pay, and the project was completed 16 calendar days ahead of schedule.
  • Work on US 72 in Tishomingo County, Mississippi. The company milled and overlaid the road, which had a large number of four-lane/town crossovers and adjacent tie-in road connections.


MISSOURI

Delta Companies Inc. of Cape Girardeau, Mo.

 

  • Work on Route 74 in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri. The company placed a 1.5-inch asphalt overlay on the road, using 25 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes.
  • Work on Routes FF and 172 in Butler and Wayne Counties, Missouri. The company placed a 1-inch overlay on the roads, improving their smoothness and safety. Delta Cos. used sustainable paving practices, incorporating 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes.
  • Work on various roads in Pemiscot County, Missouri. The project consisted of cold milling and resurfacing, with a 1-inch asphalt overlay, approximately 30 miles of roadway. Both of the asphalt mixes used for the project included recycled asphalt shingles (RAS), steel slag, and a high percentage of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP).
Pace Construction Co. Inc. of St. Louis, Mo.
  • US 63 mill-and-overlay project in Phelps County, Missouri. This 25-mile construction zone was designed by the state and Federal Highway Administration to study the effects of increased density on pavement longevity. The project was divided into four parts: a control section, an increased compactive effort section, a modified mix section, and a performance testing section of hot-mix asphalt.

 


NEVADA

Granite Construction Co. of Sparks, Nev.
  • Mill and overlay of 2.6 miles of SR 648 in the industrual and commercial areas of Sparks and Reno in Washoe County, Nevada. The company worked 24 hours a day to complete the project in one paving season instead of two, limiting the disruption to businesses and motorists. To save energy, reduce costs, and limit greenhouse emissions, Granite Construction Co. pulverized the existing pavement in place, then reused some of it for the roadbed.


NEW HAMPSHIRE


Pike Industries Inc., A CRH Co. of Belmont, N.H.
  • Work on Allen Avenue in Portland, Maine. Working in a high-traffic area, the company milled the road and then placed an overlay. The company performed most paving activities during the day but completed the intersection work at night. Pike Industries incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, a sustainable paving practice that reduces the use of virgin aggregates and cuts greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Overlay of I-89 in Grafton and Sullivan Counties in New Hampshire. The company sprayed a thin coat of polymer modified asphalt emulsion, then placed a thin-lift bonded wearing course overlay. Despite this being its first time with this process, the company achieved excellent results and produced a high-quality, smooth surface. Pike Industries Inc. incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the product mixes.
  • Work on Route 104 in Sidney, Maine. The project included shoulder rehabilitation, pothole repair and leveling and placement of an asphalt overlay. The company included 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in all the asphalt mixes.
  • Work on Route 108 in Stowe, Vermont. The company won the bid under the Vermont Agency of Transportation's new ID/IQ bidding process, so it started contract work within six days of winning the bid. Pike Industries milled the road, spot leveled it, and overlaid the road with superpave asphalt mix.
  • Work on Route 133 in Jay, Maine. The company rehabilitated shoulder areas of various widths along this route, which carries heavy truck traffic. It filled potholes and leveled the road before placing an overlay on the road. Using sustainable paving practices, Pike Industries Inc. incorporated 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes.
  • Work on Route 7 in Dover and Foxcroft, Maine. The company used a cold planer to profile the road, filled potholes, and leveled it before surfacing it with layers of hot-mix asphalt. Pike Industries incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes.
  • Work on Routes 11 and 139 in Clinton, Maine. The company milled the roads to correct their cross slope and then placed a reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) base followed by two hot-mix asphalt layers. The use of RAP was a sustainable paving practice since it reduces the use of virgin aggregates and cuts greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Work on Routes 16 and 27 in Rangeley, Maine. The company filled potholes, placed a leveling course and milled the roads in some places before placing an asphalt overlay. It also built a shoulder to widen the roadway to improve its safety. Pike Industries used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes.
  • Work on various roads in northern New Hampshire. This project included nine sections, each requiring detailed scheduling techniques because of the multiple operations occurring at one time. Due to the high volume of traffic and some night working hours, project managers had to plan carefully to keep motorists and workers safe during paving. Pike Industries used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes, saving on virgin aggregates and helping to reduce emissions.
  • Work on various roads in Reading and Windsor, Vermont. The project included guardrail improvements and the leveling and overlay of 20 miles of roads.


NEW JERSEY

Earle Asphalt Co. of Wall, N.J.
  • Milling and overlay of Routes 35 and 37 in Ocean County, New Jersey. The state had a very aggressive project schedule for these roads, which carry heavy beach traffic during the summer. During these months, the company was only permitted to work Monday through Thursday nights.
  • Work on various roads in Mercer County, New Jersey. One section of Route 130, in the heart of Hamilton Township, was particularly challenging because it is lined with multiple businesses and shopping plazas. The company had to coordinate work carefully to ensure that milling and paving operations each had the trucks they needed.
Tilcon New York Inc., A CRH Co. of Parsippany, N.J.
  • Work on Route 440 in Jersey City, New Jersey. This route was ranked by the New Jersey Department of Transportation as the fifth most dangerous in the state, and includes many large shopping centers, car dealerships, upscale condos, restaurants and shops. Working at night, Tilcon New York milled and paved the road and performed other work including electrical upgrades, drainage and concrete repairs.
  • Work on several sections of Route 80 in Morris, Sussex, and Warren Counties, New Jersey. Working during limited nighttime hours, the company milled and paved the road, which is one of the most congested commuter routes in the state. Tilcon New York used a large number of safety personnel on the job.
  • Work on various roads in Warren County, New Jersey. The two-lane, winding rural roads, while picturesque, were sometimes challenging to get to. The company planned schedules and coordinated traffic to ensure the safety of commuters and other motorists. Tilcon New York worked closely with local engineers, municipalities and law enforcement while producing a smooth, high-quality asphalt road.

 

NEW YORK

Callanan Industries Inc., A CRH Co. of Albany, N.Y.
  • N.Y. Thruway in Kingston, N.Y. Almost 95,000 tons of asphalt was used to pave 112 miles with the help of a material transfer device to achieve smoothness and a high ride quality. A 37.5mm mix was used to fill concrete full-depth repair holes, while a 12.5mm mix was used as a leveling course and a top course. A safety system was put in place to alert crews of any lane intrusions.
Jointa Lime Co. of Wilton, N.Y.
  • Work on Route 9 in Orange County, New York. The project included the repair of several thousand linear feet of asphalt gutter as well as repaving. The company used a specially fabricated template for paving that fit the shape of the gutters.

 

NORTH CAROLINA

APAC-Atlantic Inc., Thompson-Arthur Division, A CRH Co. of Greensboro, N.C.
  • I-40 in Mocksville, N.C. This large project was divided into three sections and included asphalt placement, four bridge deck and substructure rehabilitations, several thousand square yards of concrete repairs, miles of new guardrail, pavement markings, and shoulder reconstruction. Some of the phase work had very strict deadlines, which required close planning and coordination with the North Carolina Department of Transporation.
Fred Smith Co. of Raleigh, N.C.
  • Work on I-440 in Wake County, North Carolina. The project included the milling and overlaying of an existing pavement on one of the most heavily traveled interstates in the Raleigh area. The company worked with the North Carolina Department of Transportation to develop a schedule that minimized workers' exposure to traffic.
S.T. Wooten Corp. of Wilson, N.C.
  • I-795 project in Wayne County, N.C. The existing pavement was milled and then filled with an intermediate course to increase cross-slope. This improved water drainage in certain areas and made the road safer during heavy rain. The intermediate lift also helped provide an extra layer of asphalt thickness for higher truck traffic levels. The intermediate course was followed by a 2-inch surface mix and then a ¾-inch modified layer. All traffic was maintained during milling and paving operations, and the road has tested and scored well for smoothness and ride quality.
Sharpe Brothers, division of Vecellio & Grogan of Greensboro, N.C.
  • I-74/US 311 in High Point, N.C. The scope of the project was large – 223,000 tons of asphalt was used – and included patching, milling, placing intermediate and surface courses, as well as shoulder work, ramp work, bridge rehabilitation, rumble strips and pavement markings. Lane closures took place at night, beginning at 8 p.m., 10 p.m. or 12 a.m., depending on the nightly schedule. Lanes were reopened by 6 a.m.


OHIO

Barrett Paving Materials Inc. of Franklin, Ohio
  • Rehabilitation of Dayton International Aiport Runways 18-36 in Vandalia, Ohio. This project required significant coordination, as the runway under construction crossed a second runway as well as the approach/safety area of a third runway. The two-lift operation was divided into three main phases to reduce the amount of time the airport operated with only one runway open.
  • Work on SR 747 in Butler County, Ohio. When the project start was delayed six months, Barrett Paving Materials worked with the county to compress the time schedule.
John R. Jurgensen of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Cincinnati Municipal Airport, Lunken Field, Runway 3R-21L mill and overlay project. The project began with 4 inches of bituminous milling followed by 23,500 tons of asphalt resurfacing placed in two lifts. The first lift was achieved with a 25-foot mat thickness, allowing the 150-foot wide runway to be placed in six passes. The second lift used a mat width of 18.75 feet, which allowed for staggered and fewer longitudinal joints. The project also included the full-depth removal and replacement of the adjoining "Taxiway A."
  • Mill and overlay of SR 571 and SR 718 in Miami County, Ohio. The company repaired the pavement, planed the existing surface, then placed a 1-inch course of warm-mix asphalt. Work also included installation of ADA compliant curb ramps and a safety edge at some sections of the pavement shoulder. John R. Jurgensen took the reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) from the planing and incorporated it into the new surface material.
  • Mill and overlay of SR 72 in Greene and Clinton Counties in Ohio. The project included pavement repair and planing followed by overlays totaling 3 ¼ inches. All of the asphalt mixes used for the project were produced using warm-mix asphalt technology and included reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP).
John R. Jurgensen of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Mill and overlay of SR 4 in Fairfield, Ohio. The project included the cold planing, leveling and surfacing of the road, construction of a right turn lane at one intersection, and removal and replacement of existing catch basins, curb and sidewalk. The company used warm-mix asphalt technology and incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes.
Shelly & Sands Inc. of North Jackson, Ohio
  • Work on US 224 and US 446 in Mahoning County, Ohio. Working on a road with high traffic volumes, and with tight constraints on the construction zones, the company placed a fine-graded polymer asphalt overlay on these roads.
Shelly & Sands Inc. of Zanesville, Ohio
  • 5.7-mile mill-and-overlay of I-77 in Guernsey County, Ohio. A total of 23 lane miles was milled and paved and one interchange was completely rehabilitated from full-depth removal of concrete pavement to full-depth placement of asphalt. The project was part of a pilot program that required the paver-mounted thermal profiler data collected on the intermediate and surface courses to be used for research and information gathering for future trials.
  • I-80 in Mahoning County, Ohio, which was the largest reconstruction project to date for the company. The scope of the project was broad: build 18 lane miles of full-depth pavement, move 300,000 cubic yards of excavation or embankment, install 50 miles of drainage, place 153,000 tons of aggregate base, and pave 380,000 tons of hot-mix asphalt. The construction zone crossed four major state routes and involved one other major interstate, I-680.
The Shelly Co., A CRH Co. of Twinsburg, Ohio
  • Work on Chamberlin Road and SR 82 in Mantua, Ohio. Because the existing pavement was in very bad shape, the company used a multiplex grade system on its milling machine, producing a smooth milled surface.
  • Mill, overlay, and widening of exit 209 on the Ohio Turnpike in Portage County, Ohio. The project was difficult because of the large number of tractor trailers that park at the ramp, which required the company to do a great deal of the paving at night. The ramps are so narrow at the bridges that the company had to stop and hold traffic just to get its equipment through.
  • Ohio Turnpike in Portage County. This was the largest resurfacing project ever awarded by the Ohio Turnpike and Infrastructure Commission, with the paving of more than 90 lanes miles in addition to 60 miles of shoulder paving. For the safety of motorists and crews, more than 3,000 traffic drums were used during construction. The project's final IRI numbers averaged between 28-34.
  • Work on Routes 14 and 59 in Ravenna, Ohio. The company faced several challenges on this project: nighttime paving, an asphalt mix that is highly sensitive to temperature, varying pavement widths and traffic control on a 50-mph road. The company used a second paver to complete the job, producing a smooth, high-quality pavement.
  • Work on SR 44 and Randolph Road in Randolph, Ohio. The company used a profile mill to correct the rutting on the road and create a smooth surface for the final asphalt course.
The Shelly Co., A CRH Co. of Twinsburg, Ohio
  • Mill and overlay of Erieside Avenue and Al Learner Way in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The road, along the Lake Erie shoreline, carries heavy vehicle and pedestrian traffic. The Shelly Co. did extensive repairs to the road before milling and paving it. Despite cold, snowy spring weather that made paving difficult, the company produced a smooth, high-quality asphalt pavement before the Rock Hall of Fame's induction ceremony.
  • Mill and overlay of Superior Avenue in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Since the road is heavily traveled, with two sports stadiums and the historic warehouse district nearby, the company had restricted working hours. It also had to coordinate with seven other contractors on ADA ramps, sidewalk work, and other repairs and improvements.
The Shelly Co., A CRH Co. of Thornville, Ohio
  • Work on Northpointe Drive in Zanesville, Ohio. Part of the road required full-depth pavement repair and underdrain installation. Working in a heavily traveled area, with multiple commercial driveways, The Shelly Co. milled and then paved the road.
  • Work on the Olde Eight Road in Summit County, Ohio. Working on a tight, 30-day schedule, the company had to do extensive full-depth pavement edge repair before it milled and paved the road.
  • Sofidel project in Circleville, Ohio, which used almost 56,000 tons of asphalt for new construction on US 23. The Shelly Co. was up against other trades working on the project and very tight drainage issues. A 3-inch base course, 2-inch leveling course and 2-inch binder course preceded the surface overlay of a 12.5mm mix, 1.5 inches in depth. A 1.5-inch T-1 lift was also part of the road's structural support.
  • Overlay on SR 124/143 in Meigs County, Ohio. Fine-graded asphalt concrete was used on the narrow, hilly, curvy roads in this project.
  • Work on SR 141 in Gallia County, Ohio. The company milled and overlaid the road and installed 1,200 feet of storm sewer. Traffic control and safety were particularly important on this job, which had two schools within its boundaries.
  • Work on SR 33 in Union County, Ohio. The company milled and resurfaced various sections of the road in Allen and Paris townships, producing a smooth, high-quality pavement.
  • Work on SR 39 in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. Because of the high volume of truck and buggy traffic on this undulating, two-lane highway, the company did milling and paving at night to minimize disruption to travelers.
  • Work on SR 541 in Coshocton, Ohio. The company milled the existing pavement and then placed a 1-inch intermediate asphalt course and a 1/25-inch asphalt surface course on the road.
  • Work on SR 7/248 in Meigs County, Ohio. Because of heavy truck traffic in the area, the road required significant pavement repair. The Shelly Co. milled this curvy, hilly, two-lane road and then placed a smooth, high-quality asphalt overlay on it, producing a smooth, high-quality asphalt pavement.
  • Work on SR 73 in Scioto County, Ohio. Due to the heavy truck traffic on the road, the company worked with the county to get the road shut down during paving.
  • Work on SR 79 in Licking County, Ohio. The company milled the existing roadway and placed intermediate and then surface courses of asphalt over the road.
  • Work on SR 93 in Muskingum County, Ohio. The company milled 1 inch from the existing roadway and then placed a 1-inch course of fine-graded polymer asphalt on it.
  • Work on US 36 in Coshocton County, Ohio. The company had to increase the depth of the milling to 1.5 inches because of delamination issues with the existing asphalt. After milling, it placed a 1.5-inch course of asphalt pavement.
The Shelly Co., A CRH Co. of Findlay, Ohio
  • Work on the Anthony Wayne Trail in Lucas County, Ohio. The project included 3.25 inches of pavement planing, full-depth asphalt and concrete repairs, and a two-course asphalt overly of the trail. The project required multiple phasing and night work due to high traffic volumes and traffic from the Toledo Zoo.
  • Work on the NANO Parking Lot in Findlay, Ohio. Because of delays caused by unseasonably wet weather, the company had to pave the project working around multiple other trades at work in the same area. Other challenges included the need to place varying thicknesses of asphalt pavement in different locations and to use asphalt mixes from two different plants.
  • Rehabilitation of 6.5 miles of SR 111 in Paulding County, Ohio. Work included pavement repairs followed by placement of a wearing course, a leveling course, and a surface course of asphalt. One challenge was to repaire badly deteriorated shoulders without going over the planned aggregate and asphalt budgets.
  • Work on SR 117 and SR 245 in Huntsville and West Liberty, Ohio. The company milled 2 inches from the existing pavement, then placed a 3-inch asphalt intermediate course and a 1¼-inch asphalt surface course. They also installed pavement markings and adjusted the manhole castings to grade.
  • Work on SR 274 in Logan County, Ohio. The project included pavement repairs, milling ½ inches from the existing road and then placing a fine-graded polymer asphalt overlay.
  • Work on SR 49/SR 219 in Mercer County, Ohio. The project, which included three separate road sections, consisted of pavement repairs, planing, and placement of a fine-graded polymer asphalt course on the road.
  • Work on SR 65 in Rossford, Ohio. The company planed 3.25 inches of the existing pavement, placed a 3.25-inch asphalt surface course, built concrete curb, and replaced sidewalks. The project involved multiple phases and extensive traffic control.


OKLAHOMA

APAC-Central Inc., A CRH Co. of Tulsa, Okla.
  • Work on SH 20 in Osage County, Oklahoma. Working with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT), the company laid one type of surface mix on the westbound side and another type on the eastbound side. This will allow ODOT to evaluate the performance of both mixes under the same conditions, and will help them produce a better-balanced mix design. The National Center for Asphalt Technology will also evaluate the performance of these two balanced mix designs.
Haskell Lemon Construction Co. of Oklahoma City, Okla.
  • Overlay of SH 105 in Logan County, Oklahoma. The company built the 8-mile project using a spray paver in multiple lifts, using asphalt mixes that contained 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Haskell Lemon Construction Co. completed the project in fewer days than allotted, improving a busy highway while limiting the impact to local traffic.
  • Mill and overlay of 2.3 miles of SH 66 in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma. The project added shoulders to a narrow and dangerous highway, providing better traffic flow through a small town. The company incorporated 25 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes.
  • Work on US 270 in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma. This was a mill and overlay project on a very busy highway. The company completed the project in a timely manner, minimizing the impact to local businesses and motorists.


OREGON

Knife River Corp., Central Oregon Division of Bend, Ore.
  • US 97 mill-and-overlay project in Jefferson County, Oregon. Paving was scheduled between 7 p.m.-7 a.m. each day on this busy thoroughfare in central Oregon, keeping traffic delays to a minimum and safety as a top priority. All paving mixes met or exceeded Oregon Department of Transportation requirements, and the company exercised best environmental practices by using 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement and 1 percent reclaimed asphalt shingles.
Knife River, Tangent Office of Tangent, Ore.
  • OR 569 project in Eugene, Ore. This busy highway in Oregon's third largest city involved work on 13 bridges in addition to the mill-and-overlay of roughly 30 lane miles. Knife River partnered with the Oregon Department of Transporation to initiate a pilot safety program with crossover closures over the course of five weekends, starting 9 p.m. Fridays and ending 5 a.m. Mondays. The two eastbound and two westbound lanes were separated by concrete barriers, with traffic moved to the opposite side of the work area.


PENNSYLVANIA

Allan Myers of Malvern, Penn.
  • I-476 reconstruction project in Lansdale, Penn. This six-mile project consumed more than 457,000 tons of asphalt over three seasons, which required careful planning to ensure all traffic switch dates were met. The company took advantage of a mild January in 2017 to place a 12.5mm wearing course. During one day in June of the same year, a company record was set by placing almost 6,000 tons of a 25mm base course in one day, only to be followed a week later by setting a new record with 6,344 tons in a single day.
Glenn O. Hawbaker Inc. of State College, Penn.
  • Rehabilitation of Harrisburg International Airport Runway 13-31 in Middletown, Penn. The project involved variable depth bituminous milling and overlay of 8,000 feet of the 200-foot wide runway. The location of the airport was 77 miles from the company's nearest asphalt plant, requiring the use of two paving crews – 48 haul trucks in total – to make the trek nightly. Additional work involved isolated repairs, blast pad pavement repair, and other runway fixtures such as lighting and markings.
Grannas Bros. Stone & Asphalt Co. Inc. of Hollidaysburg, Penn.
  • SR 99 in Blair County, just north of Altoona, Pa. The northbound and southbound lanes of a 14-mile stretch of roadway were part of a resurfacing project that included concrete patching, minor bridge repair, and bituminous paving. The asphalt mixes contained 15 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement, except the stone matrix wearing course. A total of 188,000 tons of asphalt was used, with all lifts containing an anti-strip agent. The company set a personal record with 6,066 tons placed in one day through the use of one plant, one paver and one crew, all in one 12-hour work shift.
IA Construction Corp. of Franklin, Penn.
  • Mill and overlay of 9.1 miles of SR 59 in McKean County, Pennsylvania. The company resurfaced the roadway using superpave mix designs for the flexible base, binder, and wearing courses. It incorporated sustainable practices into the project, using 10 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the wearing courses.
Lindy Paving Inc. of New Galilee, Penn.
  • SR 28 project in Allegheny County, Penn., a main thoroughfare that leads into the city of Pittsburgh. The 7-mile project included two miles of concrete patching, break and seat of the existing concrete pavement, and overlay of the entire project, which included ramps. Bridge preservation was performed on 11 structures. Long-life asphalt pavement, which is expected to extend the life of the pavement by limiting distress of the pavement structure, was used as a binder course. A stone matrix asphalt mix was used as a wearing course.
Pennsy Supply Inc., A CRH Co. of Annville, Penn.
  • Work on Industrial Road in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. The company milled the road, which had been in disrepair for many years due to the heavy truck traffic and community college commuter traffic that it carries. Pennsy Supply Inc. used green paving practices, incorporating 15 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into all of the project mixes. That conserved virgin materials and reduced greenhouse emissions.


SOUTH CAROLINA

Sloan Construction, division of Reeves Construction Co. of Duncan, S.C.
  • Reconstruction of 12 miles of I-85 in Spartanburg, S.C. The 50-year-old roadway was in such poor condition that the layers of asphalt in the right lane needed to be removed and replaced to a depth of 10 inches, and the center and left lanes to a depth of five inches. This full-depth removal work and state specified asphalt mix placement had to be completed so the road could reopen at 6 a.m.


TENNESSEE

Lehman-Roberts Co. of Memphis, Tenn.
  • I-269 project in DeSoto and Marshall Counties in Mississippi. This highway, part of a heavily traveled route from the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas to the U.S.-Canadian border in Michigan, makes a loop around Memphis and is an important roadway for commerce. Lehman-Roberts joined forces with Eutaw Construction Co. to bid and build the project. One of the biggest worries for Lehman-Roberts was completing the 465,000-ton asphalt job by the required date, but planning helped the company complete the work 113 days ahead of an adjusted completion deadline.
Summers-Taylor Inc. of Elizabethton, Tenn.
  • Hawkins County Airport Runway Rehabilitation and Safety Area Improvements in Surgoinsville, Tenn. The first task was erosion control followed by excavation and grading the new runway area. The ends of the runway were milled to a 2-inch depth and asphalt crack repair was completed. The middle 1,400-linear-foot runway was then removed, regraded and replaced with 8 inches of a P209 stone mix. This was followed by a 2-inch base lift and a 2-inch surface layer, both P401 mixes. A material transfer vehicle and sonic averaging skis on the paver helped to complete the work.
  • Work on SR 107, SR 70 and SR 351 in Green County, Tennessee. The company did the work required to prepare each section, milling the road and/or the shoulder and spot leveling, before placing a thin lift overlay on SR 70 and resurfacing SR 107 and SR 351. Summers-Taylor Inc. produced smooth, high-quality pavements under some heavy traffic conditions.
  • Work on 5.1 miles of SR 34, US 11E and US 321 in Greene County, Tennessee. The company performed spot leveling and then used sonic averaging skis and a shuttle buggy to place a 1 ¼-inch asphalt overlay on the roads' surfaces. It also placed 2 inches of shoulder stone on the entire length of the project. Summers-Taylor Inc. produced smooth, high-quality asphalt pavements.
  • Work on SR 400, US 19E and SR 44 in Carter and Sullivan Counties, Tennessee. The company spot leveled SR 400 and 19E, then placed a thin asphalt overlay on the roads. For SR 44, the company milled the road, placed a leveling course as necessary and then placed a 1 ¼-inch asphalt overlay. Summers-Taylor used a shuttle buggy and sonic averaging skis to produce high-quality roads with excellent ride smoothness.
  • Work on SR 67 in Washington and Carter Counties. The company milled the road 1 ¼ inches then placed a 1 ¼ asphalt surface using a shuttle buggy and sonic average skis.
  • Work on SR 93, SR 351 and SR 53 in Greene and Washington Counties, Tennessee. The company spot leveled all three roads, placed a tack coat and then a thin-lift asphalt overlay on the combined 28-mile length of the roads. Summers-Taylor Inc. used a shuttle buggy and sonic averaging skis to build a smooth, quality asphalt pavement with an excellent ride.
  • Work on SR 94 in Hawkins County, Tennessee. The company clipped and cleaned the road's edges, performed spot leveling, applied a tack coat and then paved the road with a thin asphalt overlay. The company used a shuttle buggy and sonic averaging skis to produce a smooth, high-quality asphalt pavement.


TEXAS

Angel Brothers Enterprises of Baytown, Texas
  • Reconstruction of I-35 in Comal County, Texas. Because this was a road with high traffic volumes, the company did all work at night. Angel Brothers Enterprises used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into some of the asphalt mixes to conserve virgin aggregate.
Drewery Construction of Nacogdoches, Texas
  • Overlay of US 79 in Rusk County. The company used sustainable paving practices for the project, including the maximum allowed amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes to reduce the need for virgin aggregates.
Durwood Greene Construction of Stafford, Texas
  • Work on BS 288 B in Brazoria County, Texas. The company placed an overlay on the road, producing an extremely smooth pavement with excellent rideability.
Kiewit Infrastructure South of Ft. Worth, Texas
  • I-10 project in Crockett County, Texas. This 74,500-ton project was a complete highway reconstruction covering a 10-mile section that had become severely deteriorated in recent years due to an increase in traffic volume. Through the use of emulsion injection and 19 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement, the new section is smooth and easy to ride.
Madden Contracting of Longview, Texas
  • Work on US 59 in Harrison County, Texas. The company placed a two-inch overlay on the road, achieving an excellent improvement in ride quality. Madden Contracting incorporated sustainable paving practices into the project, using 10 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mix to reduce the use of virgin aggregate.
Richard Drake Construction of Powderly, Texas
  • Overlay of SH 19 in Rains County, Texas. The company used the maximum allowed percentage of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, a sustainable paving practice that reduces the use of virgin aggregates.
Texas Materials, A CRH Co. of Cedar Park, Texas
  • Work on FM 3470 in Bell County,Texas. The company placed a thin overlay mix on the road, producing a smooth pavement with an excellent ride quality.
TexasBit, A CRH Co. of Dallas, Texas
  • Overlay of almost six miles of US 81 in Montague County, Texas. The company used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in the project's superpave mixes, a sustainable paving practice that reduces the use of virgin materials and reduces emissions.


UTAH

Granite Construction Co. of Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Mill and overlay of SR 210 in Salt Lake County, Utah. This is a heavily traveled canyon road in one of the county's major watersheds. In just four days of construction, Granite Construction produced a smooth asphalt road with no safety or environmental incidents.
  • Mill and overlay of SR 224 and SR 248 in Summit County, Utah. The project required careful planning and scheduling since the road connects Park City to I-80 and carries heavy commuter and tourist traffic. Granite Construction Co. produced a smooth, high-quality road seven days ahead of schedule, earning bonuses for the pavement's mat and joint densities.
Hales Sand & Gravel, A CRH Co. of Redmond, Utah
  • Work on SR 137 in Sanpete County, Utah. The company placed a .5-inch leveling course and then a 1.5-inch surface course of stone matrix asphalt. It also added a turn lane and acceleration at the entrance to one subdivision. Hales Sand & Gravel gained additional width on the road and produced a pavement that had a 66 percent improvement in the quality of its ride.
  • Work on SR 28 and US 89 in Sevier and Sanpete Counties in Utah. The project consisted of building a new acceleration/deceleration lane. The company first used hot-in-place asphalt recycling; this was the first project in the state to use this technique. It then laid a 1 ½-inch stone matrix asphalt over the recycled asphalt layer.
  • Work on SR 62 in Sevier and Piute Counties in Utah. The company gained additional width when it placed an asphalt overlay on the road, making it safer for the traveling public. Hales Sand & Gravel paved 22 miles of two-lane roadway and improved the quality of its ride by an average of 75 percent.
Staker Parson Materials & Construction, A CRH Co. of Ogden, Utah
  • Mill and overlay of SR 167, an 11-mile scenic route known as Trapper's Loop that leads to the mountains in Mountain Green and Huntsville, Utah. The road's many steep slopes and several curves were adeptly handled by the construction crews. The project ranged from 1-inch milling to full pavement reconstruction in some areas. Guardrails, including 20,000 feet of motorcycle guardrail, were replaced throughout the project. About 23 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement was used to complete a safe and rideable road.


VIRGINIA

Allan Myers of Glen Allen, Va.
  • Milling and overlay of I-64 in Albemarle County, Virginia. The company had to carefully coordinate closing each ramp to mill and overlay it in the allotted time frame. Allan Myers also incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mix used on the project, conserving natural resources and reducing the need for virgin aggregates and binder.
  • Work on I-85 in Brunswick County, Virginia. The company milled and overlaid 4.35 lane miles of southbound and northbound I-85, earning a bonus for the road's rideability. Allan Myers incorporated sustainable paving practices into the project, using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes.
  • Work on I-85 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia. The company milled and paved 16.58 lane miles of I-85 northbound and southbound, producing a road that earned the highest possible bonus for its rideability. By using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in all of the project mixes, Allan Myers preserved natural resources and reduced greenhouse gases.
  • Work on I-95 in Chesterfield and Prince George Counties in Virginia. The company paved 8.93 lane miles of I-95 southbound, producing a road that won a bonus for its rideability. The company planned its mill and operations carefully because of the road's heavy traffic conditions. Allan Myers incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the paving mixes.
  • Milling and overlay of Routes 33 and 17 in King and Queen County and Middlesex County in Virginia. The company planned the work very carefully to be as efficient as possible while providing a high-quality pavement. Allan Myers used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mix.
Virginia Paving Co.
  • Reconstruction of the two-lane Route 66 (Old Ox Rd.) in Sterling, Va. A five-mile stretch of roadway was widened to four lanes to improve access for motorists to many points in Northern Virginia, including Dulles Airport. A new signalized intersection at Old Ox Rd. and Loudoun County parkway was also part of the project, in addition to a pedestrian and bike path.


WASHINGTON

Granite Construction Co. of Vancouver, Wash.
  • Work on various roads in Clark County, Washington. This project was comprised of 22 different road segments, including major thoroughfares, neighborhood streets and a parking lot for a park. The company overlaid all segments, except for the park, which was ground and inlaid. With so many separate segments, the company had to plan carefully and work with the owner to overcome logistic and scheduling challenges. Granite Construction used the maximum allowable reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes to conserve virgin aggregates and reduce greenhouse emissions.
Granite Construction Co. of Vancouver, Wash.
  • Mill and overlay of SR 503 in Clark and Skamania Counties in Washington. The project location was a problem, since lack of cell phone service in some areas made communication difficult. The company worked closely with inspectors to overcome this difficulty and produce a high-quality pavement. Granite Construction Co. used sustainable paving practices, incorporating 36 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes.
Poe Asphalt Paving Inc. of Clarkston, Wash.
  • Work on US 95 in Beneweh County, Idaho. This project consisted of removing the existing asphalt pavement, regrading and placing base aggregate, installing concrete culverts, and placing three lifts of asphalt. Heavy traffic and the late October temperatures made the project challenging. The company used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes, a sustainable choice that preserves virgin aggregate, reduces greenhouse emissions, and helps keep costs down for taxpayers.


WISCONSIN

Northeast Asphalt Inc., a Walbec Group Co. of Greenville, Wis.
  • New Holstein Municipal Airport in New Holstein, Wis. Northeast Asphalt and its contractors performed some of the work out of normal construction sequence to complete the job before the end of the paving season. The existing asphalt pavement was pulverized and then repaved, using 28 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement in the surface mix and 23 percent in the binder layer.
  • Work on SH 23 in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. Work included widening of the road's shoulders in certain areas, milling and overlay of the existing pavement, bridge deck overlay, storm sewers, sidewalk, signing, and pavement marking. The company used a material transfer machine, state-of-the-art grade control equipment, and reference skis to achieve the smoothest possible pavement.
  • Work on the mill and overlay of SH 55 in Outegamie County. Wisconsin. Project challenges included a tight schedule that was complicated by multiple holidays and rains that delayed culvert replacement. The company's use of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) for the superpave mixes helped control costs and reduced the need for virgin materials.
  • US 10 project in Manitowoc County, Mich. This project was divided into three sections to include milling, shoulder widening, excavation, concrete base patching, surface pavement, storm sewer replacement, and more. Different phases of the project required various devices to help achieve a smooth ride, compaction and a long-lasting centerline joint. These included a material transfer device, grade control and reference skis, a mix of steel drum and rubber-tired rollers and a longitudinal joint heater.