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2016 Quality in Construction

 

“The asphalt pavement industry is committed to building quality pavements that deliver high performance and drivability to the public,” said Michael Cote, NAPA 2015 Chairman. “All contractor’s projects earning a Quality in Construction Award are measured against industry best practices designed to live up to our promise. I’m honored to say that, in earning a 2015 QIC Award contractors have met or exceeded these rigorous standards.”

 

For 2016, 214 projects completed by 79 companies were honored with a Quality in Construction Award. Seventy-five of the projects were singled out for their use of sustainable construction practices, such as incorporating reclaimed and recycled materials and using warm-mix asphalt.

 

Details on the winners and their projects follow.

 

 

2014QICCollage 

 

 

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

Colorado

Florida

Georgia

Idaho

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

New Hampshire

New Jersey

 New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Oklahoma

Pennsylvania

South Carolina

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Virginia

West Virginia

Wisconsin

 

ALABAMA

Dunn Construction Co. Inc. of Birmingham, Ala.
  • Paving of the entrance and parking deck of the Grandview Medical Center in Birmingham, Ala. Due to the tight completion deadline, the company planned work carefully to maximize production. It also used green paving techniques, incorporating the maximum percentages of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes and also including steel slag and blast furnace slag.
  • Widening of Interstate 459 in Jefferson County. The company had to work at night due to heavy traffic and plan precisely with its contractors to finish the grading, planing, grinding, and paving on time. Dunn Construction employed green paving techniques to produce a quality pavement, using the maximum allowed amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in the mixes and also including steel and blast furnace slag.
  • Work on Interstate 59 in Jefferson County. The company managed multiple subcontractors on the project and, through careful scheduling, completed the asphalt paving work well ahead of the deadline.
  • Widening of State Route 119 in Shelby County. Project challenges included phasing work around heavy traffic congestion to maintain the schedule. The company employed sustainable paving techniques, using the maximum percentage of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes and including steel and blast furnace slag.

 

McCartney Construction Co. Inc. of Dothan
  • Work on the Anniston Eastern Bypass in Calhoun County. The company used innovative traffic control techniques to construct the northern portion of this road; it is located on a closed Army base that is being repurposed. McCartney Construction employed GPS grade control for all aspects of grading, base, and paving. In addition, by incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into all the project mixes, the company conserved natural resources.

 

Midsouth Paving Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co., of Gadsden, Ala.
  • Work on Dothan Regional Airport. The project’s scope changed during construction from removal and replacement of a concrete ramp with asphalt to a complete reclamation of the ramp with undercutting and extensive excavation. Rain and varying soil conditions added more complications. Midsouth Paving incorporated green practices, using asphalt mixes with 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP).
  • Mill, overlay, and widening of State Route 10 in Pike County. The company worked closely with quality control technicians to resolve density issues caused by underlying surface issues, changing its standard rolling patterns as needed. It also used sustainable paving techniques, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes to reduce the use of virgin materials required.
  • Milling and overlay of State Route 167 in Geneva County. The company did most of the work in February, facing challenges that included rain delay, cold temperatures and a 30-minute hauling distance between asphalt plant and worksite. Midsouth Paving used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into mixes to reduce the use of virgin materials.

 

Midsouth Paving Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co., of Montgomery, Ala.
  • Work on Interstate 22 in Birmingham, Ala. This section of road was the last piece constructed connecting Birmingham to Memphis, Tennessee. The company built the road on a tight time frame, with 6 inches of Superpave asphalt base, 3 inches of Superpave binder and a 1.5-inch course of stone mastic asphalt.

 

Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Ariton, Ala.
  • Work on State Route 27 in Enterprise, Ala. The company milled and filled the roadway, then placed a surface course of open-graded friction asphalt to help reduce pavement-tire noise and splash and spray during wet conditions.
  • Work on State Route 27 in Ozark, Ala. The company widened the road, then milled and overlaid the entire pavement with a ¾-inch surface course of hot-mix asphalt.

 

Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Dothan, Ala. 
  • Work on State Route 145 in Shelby County. Working both night and day shifts, the company milled and overlaid the road while coordinating and managing work with six subcontractors. Wiregrass Construction used sustainable paving practices, using 15 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and 5 percent recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in the asphalt mixes. This reduced the need for virgin asphalt by more than 2 percent.

 

Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Guntersville, Ala.
  • Work on State Route 35 in DeKalb County. The company employed green paving techniques for the project, including 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the surface course of asphalt and 35 percent RAP in the binder course. This conserves national resources by reducing the use of virgin materials.

 

Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Montgomery, Ala.
  • Work on U.S. 80 in Macon County. The company placed a hot mix asphalt overlay on nine miles of the road from milepost 157.53 to milepost 167.29. Wiregrass Construction produced an asphalt pavement that greatly improved the drivability of U.S. 80 for area commuters. Work on Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base runway 15/33. Through GPS-controlled milling and leveling, the company was able to correct very critical cross slopes in the keel section of the runway.

 

Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Red Level, Ala.
  • Work on U.S. 331 in Brantley, Ala. The company had to perform this mill and overlay job during the summer while safely maintaining heavy beach traffic. The company used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into project mixes to reduce the need for virgin materials. 

 

 

ALASKA

Exclusive Paving of North Pole, Alaska
  • Reconstruction and widening of the Goldhill Road bicycle and pedestrian pathway in Fairbanks, Alaska. Exclusive Paving used sustainable paving practices using warm-mix asphalt (WMA) to reduce greenhouse gases and incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into project mixes to limit the use of virgin materials.

 

 

ARKANSAS

APAC-Central Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Fayetteville, Ark.
  • Work on 7 miles of Interstate 49 in Washington and Benton counties. The company widened the existing two-lane road into four lanes by expanding the road into the 60-foot grass median. The project included excavation, grading, drainage, median barrier wall, bridge widening, and asphalt paving. Working mostly at night, APAC-Central planned work carefully to build a smooth, dense pavement 55 days ahead of schedule.

 

R.K. Hall Construction Ltd. of Texarkana, Ark.
  • Work on Texarkana Regional Airport runway 4/22. The company used two pavers in echelon on the runway project, completing all work in an area within a shift to eliminate excess joints. Because of bad weather, R.K. Hall Construction laid both the base and surface courses in one 23-hour period.

 

 

CALIFORNIA

Granite Construction Co. of Bakersfield, Calif.
  • Reconstruction of Honda Proving Center of California's winding track. The company’s green paving techniques included repurposing all the existing asphalt, use of nearby borrow material and the addition of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) to the mixes for access roads. Innovations in mix design and paving techniques resulted in the construction of asphalt pavement that meets exacting specifications and stands up to the area’s extreme weather conditions.

 

Granite Construction Co. of Lancaster, Calif.
  • Reconstruction of the oval track at Honda Proving Center of California. The company designed special asphalt mixes for improved durability in the difficult environment. To ensure the desired high level of smoothness, Granite Construction Co. re-profiled any problem sections. The company also used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) on the track’s access roads and ramps to conserve natural resources; it reduced imported and exported material by 320,000 tons.

 

 

COLORADO

The Brannan Sand & Gravel Co. of Denver, Colo.
  • Reconstruction of Rock Creek Circle in the town of Superior, Colo. The company milled the road, installed and compacted 12 inches of fly ash/cement-treated sub grade. It then graded and paved the surface with six inches of asphalt mix. The company worked in three phases to limit inconvenience to the area’s residential and business traffic. It also installed a new median and crosswalks. Work on Interstate 25 in Denver, Colo. The company milled and then overlaid the four lanes and one auxiliary lane in each direction. It partnered with the Colorado Department of Transportation to adjust lane closure times and complete the project before nighttime temperatures dropped too low for paving.   Overlay of 1st Avenue and Steele Street in Denver, Colo. Traffic was a major challenge since the project bordered the Cherry Creek Mall on the north and east sides. By carefully scheduling work with the City and with the mall management.

 

Elam Construction of Grand Junction, Colo.
  • Mill and overlay of U.S. 40 (Rabbit's Ear Pass) in Steamboat Springs, Colo. The company partnered with the Colorado Department of Transportation to overcome challenges that included the project’s 9,800-foot elevation. Elam Construction used sustainable paving techniques, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) into the asphalt mixes.

 

Four Corners Materials, an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Bayfield, Colo.
  • Work on U.S. 550 in San Juan County. The two-lane road is a steep mountain pass with grades exceeding 8 percent in some areas. Challenges included traffic, large load trucks, motorcyclists, motor homes, and weather, as well as the 30-plus-mile haul distance from the asphalt plant to the site. Through careful planning.

 

Martin Marietta of Westminster, Colo.
  • Work on MillerCoors parking lot in Golden, Colo. The company had to rebuild two parking lots without shutting down the customer’s operations. Martin Marietta accelerated the paving schedule on an employee lot to complete it in one week instead of two — speeding up the project delivery. For the bus tour lot, Martin Marietta could pave only one day per week, and it had to ensure that the lot could be safely used the other six days. The company improved drainage flows, updated all ADA areas, replaced deficient concrete and eliminated trip hazards in the existing 35-year-old lot.
  • Work on the Martin & Martin parking lot in Lakewood, Colo. The company fixed grading and drainage problems by performing corrective milling, installing raised islands, and laying a leveling course of asphalt. The pavement now drains well and provides Martin & Martin shoppers with a smooth, high-quality parking lot. Work on Cottonwood Drive in Parker, Colo. The project involved road construction for a new housing subdivision and required partnering and coordination of schedules with Lennar Homes and the various land development trades.

 

Oldcastle Southwest Group of Grand Junction, Colo.
  • Work on U.S. 50 in Grand Junction, Colo. The project included the reconstruction of the main highway leading into the city from the southeast. The company also replaced curb, gutter and medians in several road sections. It milled the existing road and placed a new surface in some sections, while in others it overlaid the existing roadway. Oldcastle Southwest Group also repaired some sections of a bridge deck.
  • Work on Spring Creek Pass in Lake City, Colo. The company used a cold in-place recycling process on the existing road before placing a 1 ½-inch overlay. Oldcastle Southwest Group employed sustainable paving techniques, incorporating 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement into the asphalt mixes to reduce the use of virgin materials.

 

 

CONNECTICUT

Tilcon Connecticut Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of New Britain, Conn.
  • Work on Interstate 95 in New London, Conn. This mill and overlay project was logistically complicated; work was done at night, with the company maintaining traffic with detours around numerous on and off ramps. Structural concerns restricted milling and microsurfacing operations to one lane on the Gold Star Bridge. Tilcon Connecticut used six different pavement mixtures, including some warm mix asphalt.

 

 

FLORIDA

Ajax Paving Industries of Florida LLC of Fort Myers, Fla.
  • Milling and overlay of State Route 31 in Punta Gorda, Fla. The two-lane road is heavily used by farmers and truckers, making it essential for the company to use flaggers, rumble strips and similar measures to keep workers and motorists safe.

 

Ajax Paving Industries of Florida of Nokomis, Fla.
  • Work on State Route 776 (El Jobean Road) in Port Charlotte, Fla. The company performed the mill and resurfacing work at night because of lane closure restrictions. It also incorporated sustainable paving practices into the job, using 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the pavement’s structural course. Extension and reconstruction of taxiway A at Punta Gorda Airport. The company had to keep the existing taxiways and runways open to air traffic at all times, performing tie-in construction at night when the airport operations were shut down. Ajax Paving Industries produced a high-quality taxiway that exceeded the customer’s requirements for pavement placement, density, and lab results.

 

Ajax Paving Industries of Florida LLC of North Venice, Fla.
  • Work on U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail) in Naples, Fla. The company reconstructed 3.5 miles of the two-lane road, expanding it to a six-lane, divided, suburban roadway. Ajax Paving Industries suggested design changes that saved taxpayers money and the project time. They used careful planning to schedule the project and keep it on the fast track. Ajax Paving Industries produced a high-quality road that also received an award from the Design Build Institute of America.

 

Ajax Paving Industries of Florida of Tampa, Fla.
  • Work on State Route 699 (Gulf Boulevard) in Treasure Island, Fla. Traffic control on this mill and overlay project was difficult since the company had to do part of the construction during spring break in this popular beach city. Ajax Paving used up to 25 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, conserving natural resources.

 

Duval Asphalt Products Inc. of Jacksonville, Fla.
  • Work on Interstate 10 in Jacksonville, Fla. This project consisted of constructing a new interchange, widening the interstate, construction of a new roadway, and milling and resurfacing. Paving had to occur while most of the interstate was under traffic, this was possible because of asphalt’s speed of construction. With this project, Duval Asphalt Products increased the capacity of the interchange and decreased the long traffic delays in the area as well as the potential for vehicle accidents.
  • Work on State Route 5A in St. Augustine, Fla. Located in the heart of the city, in an area frequented by tourists, this section of road had suffered rutting in the center lane because of the horse-drawn buggy traffic. The company paved the new pavement surface with a high polymer, fuel-resistant asphalt mix with low air voids to prevent future rutting from horses’ hooves. With more than a year of heavy usage, the new pavement has shown no rutting or pavement defects.

 

Hubbard Construction Co. of Tampa, Fla.

  • Work on Interstate 275 in Tampa, Fla. Coordination with other contractors, scheduling, limited lane closures, and night-time paving all presented challenges to the company.

 

The Lane Construction Corp. of Lakeland, Fla.
  • Work on State Route 35 in Lakewood, Fla. Despite the project’s close proximity to two schools and a park, Lane Construction was able to mill and overlay the road with minimal interference to pedestrian and vehicle traffic. The company also had to coordinate work with CSX railroad, which had a track under active repair running parallel to the project.
  • Work on State Route 687 in St. Petersburg, Fla. A shallow groundwater table and tidal influences made subgrade conditions variable, but the company worked closely with the Florida Department of Transportation to develop a compaction method that minimized subgrade disruption. Then Lane Construction paved the stabilized subgrade with smooth asphalt surface course.
  • Work on State Route 400 (I-4) in Orlando, Fla. With the project bordering Walt Disney World and in close proximity to Universal and Sea World Parks, the company had to plan traffic control, milling, paving, striping, and asphalt production carefully. The Lane Construction Corp. used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes to reduce the use of virgin materials.

 

Midsouth Paving Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Pensacola, Fla.
  • Work on Interstate 10 in Walton County. The project involved reconstruction of the existing roadway and then placement of new asphalt. Despite record rainfall, and the need to use three different crews.
  • Work on State Route 289 (9th Avenue) in Pensacola, Fla. This was a reconstruction job in the city’s historical setting, with lane widths varying from 8 to 12 feet. Deficiencies with side streets, unexpected manhole conflicts, and a work zone that included the largest mall in the area made the project challenging.

 

Preferred Materials Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Jacksonville, Fla.
  • Work on Cedar Bay Road in Jacksonville, Fla. The project included milling the existing roadway and overlaying it with 1.5 inches of asphalt. The company used sustainable practices, incorporating 45 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mix to reduce the use of virgin aggregates and binders.
  • Work on State Route 121 (34th Street) in Alachua County. Working at night, the company milled the road and placed structural and friction asphalt mixtures on the multi-lane road to improve driver control. Preferred Materials used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes and reducing the need for virgin aggregates and binders.

 

Preferred Materials Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Tampa, Fla.
  • Work on State Route 574 in Dover, Fla. The company widened, milled and overlaid the road with asphalt. Preferred Materials coordinated work around the 10-day Plant City Strawberry Festival that draws half a million visitors to the area. Preferred Materials also had to coordinate its operations with CSX Transportation. Work on State Route 45 (U.S. 41) in Tampa, Fla. The biggest challenge the company faced was detouring traffic around a railroad crossing in the project zone. The reconstruction of the tracks included removal of the existing base, replacement with asphalt, and installation of additional base to meet the new track elevations. Although CSX allotted 14 days for the project, Preferred Materials completed a high-quality pavement in just six days.

 

Ranger Construction Industries Inc. of Winter Garden, Fla.
  • Work on Apollo Boulevard in Melbourne, Fla. The project included milling, overlay, widening, and reconstruction of the existing road plus construction of a new bridge. Scheduling was challenging because of the heavy traffic and the school located at the north end of the work zone.

 

 

GEORGIA

C.W. Matthews Contracting Co. Inc. of Marietta, Ga.
  • Work on U.S. 78 in Tucker, Ga. The project included 5-miles of milling, inlay, and resurfacing. The company achieved a notable improvement in smoothness by following Georgia Department of Transportation procedures, maintaining continuity in paving, employing experienced plant and roadway personnel, and using well-maintained equipment. C.W. Matthews also conserved natural resources by using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in project mixes.
  • Mill, patch, and overlay of State Route 1 in City of Carrollton, Ga. Because of the area’s heavy traffic, the company did much of the paving work on this 15-day, fast-track project at night. C.W. Matthews used green building techniques, incorporating 25 percent recycled materials and using local material to conserve natural resources.
  • Work on State Route 20 in Floyd County. The company used sustainable paving techniques for this mill and overlay project, designing a special asphalt mix that incorporated local aggregate as well as reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). C.W. Matthews improved the smoothness of the road by 45 percent with its work.
  • Work on State Route 60 in Lumpkin County. The company did much of the milling, patching, and overlay work at night because of the project’s proximity to North Georgia College and the heavy traffic in the area. C.W. Matthews employed sustainable paving practices, using 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes. It built a high-quality asphalt pavement with a 50 percent improvement in the smoothness of the riding surface.

 

The Scruggs Co. of Hahira, Ga.
  • Work on State Route 38 in Thomas County. The project included 9.8 miles of milling, resurfacing, and shoulder rehabilitation. The company conserved natural resources by incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt pavement mixes. With continuity of paving, close adherence to GDOT procedures, and a careful quality control plan, The Scruggs Co. improved the road’s ride quality by 57.5 percent.

 

 

IDAHO

H-K Contractors Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Idaho Falls, Idaho
  • Work on U.S. 30 in Caribou County. Working 18 hour days, the company milled and then repaved the road with Superpave asphalt mix. H-K Contractors used green paving techniques, incorporating 50 percent of the milled material into the asphalt mixes and storing the remaining 50 percent for use in further projects. The company conserved natural resources by using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes

 

Poe Asphalt Paving Inc. of Lewiston, Idaho
  • Work on State Highway 41 in Rathdrum, Idaho. The road runs parallel to U.S. 95 and is used by many truckers to bypass the city of Coeur d’Alene. The 10-mile project included pulverizing the existing pavement, stabilizing the asphalt base, and overlaying the road. The company also widened three intersections and improved others.

 

 

INDIANA

E&B Paving Inc. of Huntington, Ind.
  • Work on State Route 105 in Huntington County. The project included replacement of a pipe buried 32 feet deep. The company placed full-depth asphalt over the new pipe and varying depths of asphalt pavement in other areas of the project. After matching the new asphalt pavement grades with the existing pavement, E&B Paving milled the entire roadway and placed a 1 ½-inch asphalt overlay.

 

E&B Paving Inc. of Rochester, Ind.
  • Work on State Route 16 in White County. This project ties into two pavements that previously won Quality in Construction awards. E&B Paving performed extensive patching before milling and overlaying this heavily traveled roadway.

 

J.H. Rudolph & Co. Inc. of Evansville, Ind.

Mill and overlay of 13 miles of State Route 257 in Pike and Daviess counties. The company had to perform substantial full-depth patching along the project’s length. J.H. Rudolph & Co. worked closely with INDOT and with the general contractor to ensure that it chose the best approach to remedy each section.

 

Milestone Contractors LP of Indianapolis, Ind.
  • Work on 2nd Street in Seymour, Ind. The project included the full depth removal of the existing pavement, reconstruction and paving of the road, utility relocation and construction of retaining walls, storm drains, curb, gutter, and sidewalk.
  • Work on a roundabout on South 18th Street in Lafayette, Ind. With a school located directly south of the roundabout, the company had to limit road closures and complete the project on a very tight schedule. Other challenges included three large subdivisions and some small businesses in the area. Milestone Contractors emphasized safety in constructing the new roundabout, which includes a pedestrian bridge and walking path.
  • Work on the segment of Interstate 69 in Greene County that completes the connection between Evansville and Bloomington. With project delays reducing the paving schedule, company crews worked six days a week to finish the project on time. To reduce the project’s environmental footprint, Milestone Contractors incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) and blast furnace slag into the project mixes to the maximum degree allowed.
  • Reconstruction of 3.4 miles of Interstate 65 in Marion and Johnson counties. This was a high-profile, design-build project on an extremely busy road. Challenges included limited time for lane closures, phased construction that resulted in numerous construction joints, difficulty in scheduling asphalt haul trucks access to the site, and heavy rainfall that forced delays. The company used GPS and UTS for machine control to produce a high-quality pavement.

 

Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Lafayette, Ind.

Work on Interstate 65 in White and Jasper counties. Rieth-Riley worked with the owner to modify the project’s scope and phasing to provide a better end result while minimizing additional costs. The company employed green paving techniques, used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in the mixes to reduce the need for virgin aggregate, liquid asphalt and filler.

 

Walsh & Kelly Inc. of Griffith, Ind.
  • Mill and overlay of U.S. 41 in St. John, Ind. The company used green paving techniques, incorporating the milled asphalt (reclaimed asphalt pavement) into the project mixes. Always emphasizing safety, the company paved some portions of the project during the day and others at night due to the heavy traffic volumes. Walsh & Kelly suggested changes in production that enabled it to complete work two months ahead of schedule. The project came in 7 percent under budget due to savings in traffic control operations.

 

Walsh & Kelly Inc. of South Bend, Ind.
  • Milling and overlay of State Route 23 in South Bend, Ind. The biggest challenge was controlling traffic on this highly-traveled roadway. The company used an echelon rolling pattern to produce a densely compacted, smooth, high-quality asphalt pavement.
  • Work on State Route 19 in Wakarusa, Ind. The company milled and overlaid the road, using an echelon rolling pattern to achieve excellent pavement compaction — increasing the service life of the pavement. Despite high traffic counts that made paving difficult, Walsh & Kelly built a road notable for its high-quality and its smoothness for the local community.
  • Mill and overlay of State Route 104 in Stillwell, Ind. The company used an echelon rolling pattern to dramatically improve the compaction of the pavement and achieve high density. This effort will increase the service life of the pavement. It also incorporated green paving techniques with 35 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and 3 percent recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in the mainline surface asphalt mix.

 

 

IOWA

Manatt's Inc. of Newton, Iowa
  • Work on County Road F31 in Dallas County. The company placed a full-depth Perpetual Pavement on a full-depth reclaimed roadbed. Manatt’s used sustainable paving practices, crushing the existing concrete road to create granular shoulders and maximizing the use of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) to reduce the use of virgin materials.

 

Norris Asphalt Paving Co. of Ottumwa, Iowa
  • Work on County Road G76 in Warren County. The company placed a 1-inch asphalt overlay to minimize joint cracking and corrected the road’s cross slope before resurfacing the pavement with 3 inches of asphalt surface mix. Norris Asphalt Paving used green paving techniques, incorporating 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mix for the surface course this practice conserves national resources.

 

 

KANSAS

APAC-Kansas Inc., Shears Division, an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Hutchinson, Kan.
  • Overlay of 7.5 miles of Interstate 35 in Harvey County. Before applying the asphalt overly, the company placed a reflective crack interlayer on the northbound lanes to keep the distressed pavement from reflecting through the new overlay.

 

 

KENTUCKY

The Allen Co. Inc. of Lexington, Ky.
  • Work on U.S. 25 (the Robert R. Martin Bypass) in Richmond, Ky. The company worked at night to avoid impact on the surrounding communities, milling, and overlaying 14.7 lane miles including 15 approach roads and 27 turn lanes. The Allen Co. used sustainable paving techniques, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes to reduce the amount of virgin materials required.

 

Hinkle Contracting Co. LLC of Paris, Ky.
  • Work on the Cynthiana–Harrison County Airport. The project included construction of the aggregate base and asphalt pavement for a parallel taxiway connecting to the existing runway and hangar area. The company completed all the work within a tight 20-day schedule.

 

Louisville Paving & Construction Co. of Louisville, Ky.
  • Resurfacing of the Springs Retail Association parking lot. The company worked at night and had each section completed and striped before the retail businesses opened each morning. It also used sustainable paving practices, incorporating 21 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into mixes to reduce the use of virgin materials.

 

Rogers Group Inc. of Hopkinsville, Ky.
  • Work on I-69 in Hopkins County. The company partnered with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet on this design/build project, which upgraded the intersection of the Pennryrile Parkway and the Western Kentucky Parkway to Interstate standards. The project expanse included 5.5 miles of paving and two 400-foot overpasses.

 

Scotty's Contracting and Stone LLC of Bowling Green, Ky.
  • Work on Interstate 65 in Hart County. This 6.9-mile project added a lane and shoulder in each direction and a permanent dividing barrier wall in the median. With limited lane closures, a tight schedule and a tight budget, Scotty’s had to schedule all work carefully. Using two asphalt paving plants and two paving crews, the company was able to pave each lane its entire length in one shift.

 

 

LOUISIANA

Barriere Construction Co. LLC of Metairie, La.
  • Work at the interchange of Interstate 10, Interstate 59, and Interstate 12 in St. Tammany Parish. The project included replacing the subbase, repaving 10 miles of interstate highways and reconstructing five corresponding off-ramps. Barriere Construction Co. used information generated by a drone and GPS to produce a 3D model of the project and predetermine cross slope issues. The company incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, reducing the use of virgin materials.

 

 

MARYLAND

Gray & Son Inc. of Timonium, Md.
  • Work on Maryland 138 in Monkton. Paving challenges on this narrow rural road included hills, curves, tight turns, steep drop-offs, low-hanging tree branches, and power lines. By partnering with the State, Gray & Son kept the impact to local residents at a minimum. Although the narrow roadway and low vertical height clearance made the use of a material transfer vehicle difficult, the company used it when possible to produce a smooth asphalt road that met project specifications.
  • Work paving eleven roads in Carroll County, Maryland. Three roads required reclamation before the company placed a new asphalt base and surface course. For the other roads, Gray & Son milled the pavement from 4 to 6 inches, then used rollers of varying sizes (depending on the road’s width) to overlay the pavement. For one road, haul trucks had to back-up half a mile over a winding road to get the hot mix asphalt to the paving site.

 

 

MASSACHUSETTS

Brox Industries Inc. of Dracut, Mass.
  • Work on Logan International Airport Terminal A taxilane and taxiways E and K. Scheduling was challenging due to weather, the project’s 27 phases, and the coordination of the milling, electrical, and paving contractors with airport operations. The company incorporated green practices into the paving portion of the project, using mixes with 17.5 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) as well as warm mix asphalt (WMA) that reduced greenhouse emissions.

 

P.J. Keating Co., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Lunenburg, Mass.
  • Work on Interstate 495 in Franklin, Mass. The project included the micro-milling of a 2.1-mile stretch of heavily traveled highway. The company used warm-mix asphalt in both the open-graded friction course and the Superpave surface course. At the request of the state DOT, the company worked at night to pave the northbound side of the highway before winter, completing the project on a tight timeframe.
  • Work on the Kohl's parking lot at the Taunton Depot Shopping Center in Taunton, Mass. The company carefully phased the milling, paving, and striping work to deliver a smooth, high-quality product with minimal inconvenience to store customers and employees.
  • Work on a parking lot for an order fulfillment center in Fall River, Mass. The company began clearing the site in November 2015, placing almost half of the binder course in December 2015 to enable building construction during over the winter. The work was then completed the following year after the building construction of the order fulfillment center was completed.
  • Work on Martignetti Cos. Distribution Center in Tauton, Mass. The project included clearing 30 acres, removing topsoil and existing utilities, and placing new drainage, water and sewer. The company processed boulders found on site to help supply the gravel and aggregate required for the asphalt parking lot. P.J. Keating Co. placed half of the project’s asphalt tonnage in December so the building contractor could continue working over the winter.
  • Milling, overlay, and reconstruction of Massachusetts 140 in Princeton, Mass. The company widened the roadway, replaced culverts, cleared trees, and relocated utility poles. P.J. Keating minimized the environmental impact of the project by using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in all the asphalt mixes and by using warm mix asphalt, which reduces greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Work on Interstate 95 in North Attleborough, Mass. Scheduling was a challenge, since the project was close to two popular music venues. P. J. Keating used sustainable paving practices on the project, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and ground tire rubber into the asphalt mixes to reduce the use of virgin materials. It also used warm mix asphalt (WMA) to limit the emission of greenhouse gases.
  • Work on the overlay of the parking lot for Walmart in Raynham, Mass. The company milled the existing pavement and replaced it with 2 inches of Superpave mix.
  • Work on Conlyn Avenue, Carmine Driver, and Antony Road in Franklin, Mass. The company reconstructed the existing pavement using calcium injection, graded it, and then placed 4 inches of new pavement in two lifts. P.J. Keating worked closely with the town to minimize the inconvenience to the residents of the 100 homes in the neighborhood. It performed the bulk of the work in 5 days, completing the roads well before winter weather set in.

 

 

MICHIGAN

Ajax Paving Industries of Troy, Mich.
  • Work on Interstate 75 in Auburn Hills, Mich. Working at night, the company placed a 2-inch asphalt overlay on the road’s three travel lanes (northbound and southbound) and on its ramps and shoulders. The Superpave mixes used for the shoulders included 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement.
  • Rehabilitation of the track at Watkins Glen International Raceway. The company made drainage improvements, cold-milled the surface, removed existing concrete patches and then placed leveling courses, wearing courses, and in some track sections a drainage layer and base course as well. Ajax Paving Industries used a material transfer vehicle, asphalt paver with a dual bar tamping screed, and dual drum vibratory rollers during paving.
  • Reconstruction of airport runway 4/22 at Grosse Ile Municipal Airport. The project included the removal of the existing pavement, drainage improvements, installation of aggregate base, asphalt pavement, and lighting and electrical upgrades.

 

Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Big Rapids, Mich.
  • Reconstruction of U.S. 131 in Mecosta County. The company had to mill, crush and shape the road before repaving it in three lifts. The base course was 6 inches of Superpave mix, the binder course was 3 inches of mix, and the surface course was 1.5 inches of stone-matrix asphalt.
  • Work on U.S. 31 from Fruitvale Road to Winston Road in Muskegon and Oceana counties. The company milled the road and then placed an asphalt crack relief layer on it before repaving.

 

Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Charlevoix, Mich.
  • Reconstruction of West Central Avenue in the village of Mackinaw, Mich. The company worked closely with local agencies and area residents to ensure that the project proceeded smoothly. Despite the need to accommodate a constant flow of tourists and traffic generated by five different festivals and celebrations.
  • Work on M-66/M-55 in Lake City, Michigan. The company made pavement repairs, then placed a bituminous fiber membrane on the road to reduce reflective cracking before paving with an asphalt overlay. This was one of the first uses of the bituminous fiber membrane areas in the area.

 

Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Prudenville, Mich.
  • Construction of a parking lot for Kirtland Community College Science Center in Grayling, Mich. With many structures and concrete islands in the lot, the company had to plan asphalt paving carefully, working with other trades to ensure that the lot would be ready for students when school opened. Rieth-Riley used green paving techniques, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes to conserve natural resources.

 

 

MINNESOTA

Bituminous Roadways Inc. of Mendota Heights, Minn.
  • Work on the Hastings High School parking lot in Hastings, Minn. While constructing the project the company discovered unexpected rutting that required additional grading work. Despite this challenge, Bituminous Roadways completed a high-quality parking lot on schedule in just four weeks.

 

Hardrives Inc. of Rogers, Minn.
  • Full depth reclamation, milling, and paving of a section of U.S. 12 in Meeker County. The company incorporated the maximum reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into project mixes to conserve more than16,000 tons of new aggregates and more than 800 tons of new liquid asphalt.
  • Reconstruction of runway 14-32 at St. Paul Downtown Airport. The company had to pave the runway north to a pre-existing pavement. This required Hardrives to stop paving 30 feet from the existing pavement and then pave sideways to complete the work on the first two lifts. Other obstacles included lights that the company had to pave around.

 

Knife River Materials, Northern Minnesota of Bemidji, Minn.
  • Work on State Trunk Highway 20 in Polk County. The project consisted of 10.5 miles of an asphalt overlay plus aggregate shouldering. Despite heavier-than-usual traffic due to the road’s designation as a detour route for another project, Knife River Materials worked closely with the County and its subcontractors to keep vehicles moving.
  • Mill and overlay of approximately 8.5 miles of County State Aid Highway 5 and 29 in Marshall County. The project was bid later in the year, so the company worked closely with the County. Due to time constraints, Knife River performed most work to ensure that it would be completed in a timely manner.
  • Work on 9.8 miles of County State Aid Highway 4 in Roseau County. The project included an asphalt overlay, asphalt and aggregate shoulders, and the installation of rumble strips. With only 40 working days to complete the project, Knife River Materials worked closely with the County and its own subcontractors to ensure that it produced a dense, smooth-riding pavement on time.
  • Work on North Dakota 35, County Road 4A, and Pavilion Road in Nelson County. The company milled and overlaid approximately 11 miles of road in three different work areas. It worked closely with the County and its own subcontractors to ensure minimal disruption for area residents and visitors to nearby Stump Lake Park.
  • Work on two segments of North Dakota 12 in Pembina County. The 13-mile project consisted of an asphalt overlay, guardrail installation, and incidental work. The company worked closely with the County and its own subcontractors complete a very smooth, high-quality roadway for local motorists.
  • Work on North Dakota 22 and 27 in Barnes County close to Little Yellowtone and Clausen Spring Parks. The company milled the pavement, placed an asphalt overlay, and performed incidental work at five different project locations with a combined length of 24.5 miles. Using separate crews for highway and park areas, and working closely with the County, the Parks and its subcontractors.

 

Park Construction Co. of Spring Lake Park, Minn.
  • Work on the player’s parking lot and the playing field at U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis. The playing field was unique; it consisted of a bituminous pavement with a turf layer on top instead of the usual concrete base. Park partnered with Trimble and Caterpillar Paving, using the latest in GPS technology to produce a pavement that met all specifications and that was faster and less expensive to build as well as smoother than a comparable concrete pavement.

 

 

MISSISSIPPI

Dunn Roadbuilders LLC of Laurel, Miss.

Mill and overlay of Interstate 59 in Jones County. Working sometimes at night, the company placed two lifts of stone-matrix asphalt (SMA) with a final lift of open-graded friction course. Dunn Roadbuilders used sustainable paving practices; it convinced the Mississippi DOT to allow the trial use of asphalt mixes with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and incorporated warm mix asphalt into the project to reduce the production of greenhouse gases.

 

 

MISSOURI

APAC-Central Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Springfield, Mo.
  • Work on U.S. 60 in Barry and Lawrence counties. The company milled and overlaid the road from U.S. 60’s intersection with Route 37 to the intersection with Route 14.

 

Hutchens Construction Co. of Cassville, Mo.
  • Rehabilitation of Carroll County Airport runway 7/25. Work included the milling and overlay of the runway. Despite the challenges of scheduling runway closures, Hutchens was able to complete the project on time and with no incidents.

 

Pace Construction Co. Inc. of St. Louis, Mo.
  • Work on Interstate 64 in Chesterfield, Mo. The company placed a single 1.75-inch asphalt overlay on the existing pavement and a new base for the widened section of the roadway. It used a roller equipped with intelligent compaction technology to ensure consistent coverage of the asphalt surface mixture, producing a pavement with improved ride quality between 25 and 55 percent.

 

Superior Bowen Asphalt Co. LLC of Kansas City, Mo.
  • Work on Interstate 435 in Jackson County. Working as a subcontractor, the company milled and overlaid the road at night with limited hours for lane closures. It coordinated work with a bridge contractor to ensure that the paving was completed immediately following bridge rehabilitation; this limited the inconvenience to the traveling public.

 

 

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Pike Industries Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Belmont, N.H.
  • Work on State Route 16 in Strafford County, N.H. Challenges included night paving and the need to keep workers and motorists safe in an area notable for its inattentive drivers. The company milled and overlaid the road, minimizing traveling delays for the public while safely producing an excellent pavement that achieved great quality control results.
  • Work on State Route 113 in Orange County, Vt. This was a calcium chloride reclaim project with a cold mix base and also included some areas of mill and overlay. Work included new drainage, a railroad crossing reconstruction, and asphalt paving.
  • Work on 12 miles of State Route 6/16 in Milo, Maine. Because the existing pavement’s subbase was in poor condition, Pike Industries had to reclaim the existing material in the subbase, remix it with a stabilizer, fine grade it and then place a hot mix asphalt overlay. The use of multiple subcontractors to perform the reclamation made project scheduling difficult.
  • Work on Interstate 95 in Kennebec County. Three different paving crews worked on the project, which was one of the largest milling and paving contracts in Maine for the last decade. Due to heavy traffic, the company built the road at night, working five to six days a week from June to October.

 

 

NEW JERSEY

Tilcon New Jersey Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Parsippany, N.J.
  • Work on various roads in Bergen County. The resurfacing project consisted of work at twenty-two locations in business and residential communities throughout several municipalities. Tilcon New Jersey worked closely with local and county officials to coordinate and carefully schedule work in the multiple locations.

 

The Walter R. Earle Corp. of Farmingdale, N.J.
  • Work on commuter parking lot 8 at the PNC Bank Arts Center in Holmdel, N.J. The existing lots had ruts and cracks as deep as 3 to 4 inches. The company milled two inches off the existing lot, installed 3 inches of base and then placed a 2-inch surface course. All work had to be done on weekends. The striper followed pavers so the lot could be open and ready for traffic each week.
  • Work on the intersection of U.S. 9 and Craig Road in Freehold, N.J. Despite multiple utility issues that delayed the project, the company was able to propose value engineering changes that allowed it to complete its work before the original completion date.

 

 

NEW MEXICO

Fisher Sand & Gravel Co. of Placitas, N.M.
  • Widening of New Mexico 529 in Hobbs, and for the addition of passing and turning lanes. The company reduced the project’s environmental footprint by incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into project mixes and by using warm mix asphalt to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Fisher Sand & Gravel also employed intelligent compaction technology to enhance the pavement’s quality.
  • Work on five miles of Interstate 40 in Santa Rosa, N.M. The company milled the road and placed an inlay on the north and southbound lanes, then repaved with a Superpave warm mix asphalt wearing and warm mix asphalt open-graded friction course. The use of warm mix technologies reduced greenhouse gas emissions and eliminated potential compaction problems due to the 35-mile hauling distance between the plant and the job site.
  • Full-width mill and inlay of the north and southbound lanes of Interstate 25 in Tecolote, N.M. The company replaced the original asphalt with environmentally friendly warm mix asphalt and open-graded friction course surface. Using the warm mix made it easier for the company to produce a high-quality asphalt pavement despite the one-hour distance between the project site and the plant. The open-graded friction course will reduce splash and spray and improve visibility during rainy weather.

 

Mountain States Constructors of Albuquerque, N.M.
  • Work on U.S. 64 in Bloomfield, N.M. The full depth reconstruction project is in a heavy industrial/commercial region and included more than 68 turnouts and driveways. Work included excavation, subgrade stabilization, geogrid/geotextile application, drainage work, base course, and paving. The company partnered with NMDOT and local businesses and residents to minimize inconvenience to motorists.

 

 

NEW YORK

Barrett Paving Materials Inc. of Liverpool, N.Y.
  • Work on the access road and apron at the maintenance facility at Syracuse Hancock International Airport. The company had to ensure the road was accessible 24/7 to the airport’s maintenance equipment. When bad weather delayed the construction of the buildings, Barret Paving Materials devised a new schedule to complete its work while the other contractors were still on site.
  • Work on the second and third phases of East Genesee Street’s connective corridor in Syracuse, N.Y. The two-year reconstruction job required coordination and compromising among all stakeholders to meet the project requirements. Delays in construction work, additional work items, and other issues made the project challenging.

 

 

NORTH CAROLINA

S.T. Wooten Corp. of Wilson, N.C.
  • Repairs to runways 15L and 23R at the Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point Airfield. The company milled the existing pavement to grade, used a notch-wedge system to shape and compact the mat edge, and employed a joint heater to build a smooth pavement across the runways joints.

 

 

OHIO

A&B Asphalt, doing business as John R. Jurgensen Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Work on Greene County–Lewis A. Jackson Regional Airport. The project included full-depth repairs to the runway, replacement of a taxiway crossover, the addition of a new holding apron, and the mill and overlay of the runway. The company used a robotics system to control the elevations of the milled and paved surfaces, producing a high-quality asphalt pavement within a tight 30-day schedule.

 

Barrett Paving Materials Inc. of Franklin, Ohio
  • Work on State Route 222 in Clermont County. The two-lane resurfacing project required the company to mill and repave sections of the roadway by the end of the work day. Barrett’s paving crew built a road with a smooth uniform appearance and uniform dense mat.
  • Work on Interstate 75 in Miami and Shelby counties. Since the project included the deep mill and deep overlay of the road, the company used a contraflow traffic control system to reduce concerns about drop-offs between lanes under construction. Barrett Paving Materials employed green paving techniques, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into mixes and using warm mix asphalt in some sections to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Work on State Route 503 in Preble County. The project included a 3-inch milling of the road with an overlay of 3-inches of asphalt pavement. The company incorporated sustainable paving techniques into the project, using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in all the mixes

  

Gerken Paving Inc. of Napoleon, Ohio
  • Work on Ohio Turnpike in Fulton County. The project included the milling and overlay of the existing pavement while adjacent to live traffic. Gerken Paving used innovative scheduling and resourcing to ensure compliance with the strict contract schedule and safety of paving crew and the traveling public, by constructing the road in multiple single-lane phases. It met smoothness and density specifications.

 

John R. Jurgensen Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Work on County Road 453 (Ronald Reagan Highway) in Hamilton County. The mill and overlay project included bridge deck overlays, bridge painting, and paving work. The company incorporated the maximum allowed amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes, reducing the amount of virgin material required. It also used warm mix asphalt, which reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Work on State Route 22 in Clinton County. Work included replacement of box culverts, pavement repair, and milling and overlay. The company incorporated the maximum allowable amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes, conserving virgin materials. It also used warm mix asphalt to reduce greenhouse emissions.
  • Construction of a new roadway in Highland County that linked State Route 73 to State Route 62. Work included improvements to the existing roads and the construction of a roundabout. The company incorporated the maximum allowable reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes, reducing the need for virgin materials. It also used warm mix asphalt technology (WMA) to cut greenhouse gases while aiding in compaction.
  • Mill and overlay of State Route 730 in Clinton County. Work on this two-lane city street in Wilmington included guardrail upgrade, ADA curbs, and pavement repair. The company incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes to reduce the use of virgin materials, and used warm mix asphalt (WMA) to reduce greenhouse emissions.

 

Kokosing Construction Co. Inc. of Elyria, Ohio
  • Work on Interstate 80 in Elyria, Ohio. The two-year project included full-depth pavement removal and full-depth asphalt replacement of the right two lanes and shoulder of both the east and westbound lanes. The company used sustainable paving practices, incorporating up to 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into mixes to reduce the need for virgin materials.

 

Kokosing Construction Co. Inc. of Mansfield, Ohio
  • Milling and resurfacing of 170 streets within the city of Columbus. The company had to match various roadway sections and coordinate with subcontractors installing new ADA compliant curbs and ramps while also performing other work. Each street had to be resurfaced within 7 days of milling. Kokosing Construction Co. conserved natural resources by incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into project mixes

 

Shelly & Sands Inc. of Zanesville, Ohio
  • Work on State Route 39 in Tuscarawas County. This two-lane road in the heart of Amish Country is a main tourist route, so the company performed all paving at night, allowing the roadway to be open to vehicle traffic during the day. Using a material transfer vehicle, the company placed a 4-inch asphalt overlay in three lifts.
  • Work on State Route 11 in Ashtabula County. The company milled the road, placed two lifts of hot mix asphalt, upgraded guardrails and partnered with the Ohio Department of Transportation to make needed revisions in the field. It employed green practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes.

 

The Shelly Co., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Findlay, Ohio
  • Work on State Route 118 in Mercer County. The company made repairs to the 3.5 miles of the project, and then resurfaced it with a 424 fine-graded polymer asphalt mix. Since this was the first time this surface mix was used in the area, the company performed extra testing and took more quality control.
  • Reconstruction of 5.3 miles of Interstate 75 in Allen County. The project included two interchanges, side roads, and reconstruction of two overpasses. The company partnered with ODOT and Beaver Construction to maintain traffic and work through all project issues. The project required pavement joints due to a multi-year, multi-phased construction project.
  • Work on Interstate 75 in Wood County. The company widened 8 miles of the road in this multi-phased, multi-year project. Work involved bridge deck widening, coordination between multiple subcontractors, and paving operations.
  • Work on State Route 235 in Wood County. The company had to coordinate work carefully to complete the milling and overlay work on this bridge within the 45-day schedule. The Shelly Co. used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project’s asphalt mixes.

 

The Shelly Co., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Thornville, Ohio
  • Work on Interstate 77 in Tuscarawas County. The project included milling 1.5 inches from the road and overlaying it with 1.5 inches of asphalt. The Shelly Co. worked at night, using a material transfer vehicle and double drum rollers to achieve a good density.
  • Work on 5.2 miles of the Ohio Turnpike in Mahoning and Trumbull counties. The company reconstructed the two right lanes and the shoulders of several sections of the road, installing a portable barrier at the project’s start to protect the work zone and channel traffic safely. It removed the existing pavement, stabilized the subgrade, and built the asphalt pavement.
  • Work on State Route 243 in Coal Grove, Ohio. The company milled and overlaid seven miles of the road, which was hilly and curvy and contained multiple intersections and driveways.
  • Work on State Route 7/733 in Meigs County. The company repaired the pavement to eliminate soft areas of the existing structure and planed it to remove the rutted wearing course. The Shelly Co. then placed two courses of Superpave asphalt mixtures.
  • Work on U.S. 50 in Highland County. The company overlaid the road’s two lanes with waterproofing asphalt, in order to prolong the pavement’s service life.
  • Work on State Route 40 in Licking County. The project included the milling and overlay of this two-lane road around high traffic areas. Due to asphalt’s speed of construction work was completed safely.
  • Work on U.S. 36/State Route 60 in Coshocton County. The project included the resurfacing of the road’s two lanes for 19 miles. The company milled the road and then laid a fine graded polymer asphalt mix that Ohio DOT calls Smoothseal in one lift.
  • Work on Lewis Center Road in Delaware County. The project included the widening and overlay of a heavily traveled county road that serves as a popular state recreation area. Working under restricted paving hours and dealing with high traffic volumes, The Shelly Co. milled and overlaid the road, using inter-layers when necessary.
  • Work on Middleport Trail in Meigs County. The project included the paving of a multi-use trail path along the Ohio River. Because of the tight access to the project, the company used a small paver and material transfer vehicle.
  • Work on State Route 159 in Ross County. The project included the mill and overlay of a multi-lane road. Because of high traffic volumes in the area, The Shelly Co. worked at night, showcasing asphalt’s speed of construction by opening the workzone to traffic each day.
  • Work on State Route 310 in Licking County. The company milled two lanes of the road and then paved it in one lift.
  • Work on State Route 23 in Ross County. The project included the milling of the road’s four lanes and the placement of an asphalt overlay in one lift.
  • Work on Kerr Road in Gallia County. The company had to perform some pre-leveling of the deteriorated county road before it could place the asphalt overlay. Despite the challenges posed by the narrow roadway and the large amount of truck traffic from a nearby industrial park.
  • Work on Tarlton-Adelphi Road in Pickaway County. The project included the overlay of a rough country road. The company performed pre-leveling to prepare the road for the overlay and then produce a uniform surface course. Because of the route’s high traffic count, The Shelly Co. had to increase its traffic maintenance and flaggers.
  • Work on Dog Hollow Road in Licking County. The company placed a chip seal inter-layer on the existing two-lane roadway in order to preserve the pavement structure. The Shelly Co. then capped the pavement with a 1-inch asphalt overlay.
  • Work on Prologis Park 70 in Etna, Ohio. The project included pavement sections designed for heavy, medium, and light traffic throughout a business park. The Shelly Co. worked in multiple phases to coordinate work with several building trades and their project schedules.
  • Work on Rickenbacker Intermodal Terminal Facility in Columbus, Ohio. The project included leveling of a severely weathered, dusty subbase, followed by placement of a 12.5 mm asphalt mixture overlay. The Shelly Co. had to use a special trackless tack coat to prevent equipment from picking up the original roller compacted concrete pavement.
  • Work on Greater Portsmouth Regional Airport. Because the project area was very flat, the company had to first deal with drainage issues. The Shelly Co. performed variable depth milling to correct some areas and then paved them back with very tight elevation tolerances.
  • Work on Fairfield County Airport. When milling the runway caused unexpected problems, the company resolved the issues by paving in two lifts instead of one. It also coordinated with the airport to enable important flights to land before the lane striping was completed.

 

The Shelly Co., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Twinsburg, Ohio
  • Work on Warren Road in Cleveland, Ohio. The company suggested an alternate traffic maintenance proposal for this mill and overlay project to ensure a safer environment for motorists and its workers.
  • Work on State Route 91 in Lake County. The company worked with Lake County engineers to develop a different method of traffic control, limiting the impact of construction on the traveling public.
  • Work on West 130th Street in Medina, Ohio. The company first milled the road to correct the cross slope then overlaid the pavement. It completed all work in each area, from full depth removal to paving, in one day.
  • Reconstruction of Interstate 271 (State Route 82) in Macedonia, Ohio. The company milled the existing asphalt surface, removed and replaced the road’s base and then rebuilt a new base, binder and surface course with asphalt mixtures. The company worked in phases to accommodate work on new bridges along the project route.

 

 

OKLAHOMA

Haskell Lemon Construction Co. of Oklahoma City, Okla.
  • Work on Interstate 44 in Luther, Okla. The company built the project at night between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m., opening all lanes by morning on most weekdays and all weekends to help commuters travel to work and weekend destinations. Haskell Lemon Construction Co. partnered with Silver Star Construction to double production and complete the job 45 days ahead of schedule.
  • Work on State Highway 74 in Oklahoma City, Okla. The company completely removed an old two-lane highway and then constructed a divided, four-lane thoroughfare with a full interchange. One challenge was to maintain traffic and access to all the businesses and churches during construction.

 

 

OREGON

Knife River Corp., Northwest of Bend, Ore.
  • Reconstruction of runway 4/22 at Redmond Municipal Airport Runway. After removing the existing runway, the company replaced it with a base couse that included 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and then laid a 9-inch asphalt surface course. Crews worked around the clock for 14 days to reconstruct the intersection of runways 4/22 and 11/29.

 

 

PENNSYLVANIA

Allan Myers of Malvern, Pa.
  • Work on Interstate 95 in Harford County, Maryland. The company held monthly meetings with its subcontractors and the Maryland Department of Transportation to alleviate any problems caused by a delay of almost a year in the project’s start. Allan Myers reduced the project’s environmental footprint by utilizing all the roadway millings as reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) for the new asphalt mixes and shoulders.

 

IA Construction Corp. of Franklin, Pa.
  • Work on State Route 68 in Clarion County. The company milled 4.26 miles of existing pavement and overlaid it with a surface course of smooth asphalt. With this work, IA Construction Corp. earned PennDOT’s award for the best project in its 10-0 District.
  • Work on State Route 62 in Oil City, Pa. The company milled 6.4 miles of the road and then overlaid it with an asphalt surface mixture. IA’s construction engineer partnered with the PennDOT design to improve the cross-slopes in the Superpave elevated area of this project.

 

Lindy Paving Inc. of New Galilee, Pa.
  • Work on Interstate 376 in Pittsburgh, Pa. The company’s crews worked nights and weekends to complete the mill and overlay project; all areas milled had to be resurfaced by end of each shift. Lindy Paving reduced the project’s environmental footprint by using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in mixes, reducing the use of virgin materials.
  • Work on 3.5 miles of Interstate 76 in Allegheny County. The two-year project included full depth roadway reconstruction and widening and replacement of three overhead bridges. To conserve natural resources the company rubbilized the existing concrete pavement to use as a subbase and incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into other project mixes. Lindy Paving used a material transfer vehicle and three to four rollers in the paving train.
  • Work on State Route (SR) 18 in Monaca, Pa. The project included the relocation of the road and ramps for SR 376, which required excavation, drainage improvements, and relocation of sanitary and water lines. Despite delays that shaved five months off the project schedule, Lindy Paving partnered with PennDOT and other interested parties to successfully complete SR 18 on time. The company used green paving techniques, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project’s asphalt mixes.

 

Pennsy Supply Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Annville, Pa.
  • Work on State Route 30 in Lancaster County. Working at night, the company performed patching and shoulder restoration for milling and overlaying the western section of the project. The eastern section required only minor patching before the company applied an ultra-thin overlay. The company partnered with PennDOT to schedule work around another ongoing project in the area.
  • Work on State Route 501 in Lancaster County. Work included the mill and overlay of this road in the heart of Lititz Borough. The company worked at night to limit the impact and increase the safety of the motorists and pedestrians who frequent this shopping and dining area. Pennsy Supply built 80 new ADA compliant ramps, installed new signage, and performed paving work.

 

Pennsy Supply Inc., an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Pittston, Pa.
  • Work on State Route 106 in Hazelton, Pa. The company used innovative green paving techniques on this mill and overlay project. It added new equipment to the plant so that it could use ground tire rubber (GTR) liquid asphalt in the road’s wearing course, providing excellent resistance to rutting and cracking. The company used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) to conserve virgin aggregate and warm mix asphalt to reduce greenhouse gases.
  • Mill and overlay of 10 miles of I-80 in Columbia County. This was the first project in Pennsylvania that used stone matrix asphalt (SMA) as the wearing surface of the road without previously scratching and leveling the surface. The SMA mix contained rubber in the mix instead of fibers. Working at night in just a four-day span, Pennsy Supply paved continuously.
  • Work on State Route 4008 in Schuylkill County. The company milled and overlaid the road, performing additional grading work to relieve area residents’ previous basement flooding problems. Pennsy Supply incorporated green paving techniques into the project, using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in the asphalt mixes.

 

 

SOUTH CAROLINA

The Lane Construction Corp. of West Columbia, S.C.
  • Work on Jackson Boulevard, one of the main roads for the Army training base at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C. The project was originally intended to include milling and overlay, but the poor condition of the base required The Lane Construction Corp. to make unexpected repairs. Since the project start was delayed, the company had to pave from November to December.

 

 

TENNESSEE

Lehman-Roberts Co. of Memphis, Tenn.
  • Work on U.S. 78 in Olive Branch, Miss. The company had to begin paving operations by grinding spots of the existing pavement. Then Lehman-Roberts Company milled and overlaid the pavement. Lehman-Roberts produced a pavement with a smooth ride 25 days ahead of the scheduled completion date.
  • Work on Highway 78 in DeSoto County from Highway 305 to Bethel Road. Lehman-Roberts began the overlay project by milling the existing pavement. Then they laid down a surface course of smooth asphalt pavement. Lehman-Roberts produced a high-quality road with a great ride more than three weeks ahead of schedule.

 

Summers-Taylor Inc. of Elizabethton, Tenn.
  • Work on State Route 93 in Greene and Washington counties. The company installed spot leveling over areas where depressions were affecting the roadway, then place a thin lift of asphalt mix on the roadway restoring the surface smoothness and making local drivers happy.
  • Work on Interstate 81 in Greene County. The company milled the existing asphalt and then placed 1 ½ inches of an asphalt binder mixture followed by 1 ¼ inches of open-graded friction course. The friction course will reduce splash and spray in wet weather and reduce pavement-tire noise.
  • Work at Greeneville–Greene County Municipal Airport. The work involved relocating an existing roadway, expanding a safety zone, lengthening taxiway 5 and correcting substantial grade issues along the primary runway. The company used a GPS grade control system and three different lasers along the paving length to fine tune the grade accuracy. Widening of 3.9 miles of State Route 36 in Washington County. The high-traffic area included several businesses that had to remain open during paving. Work included grading, drainage, utilities, curbing, base stone, and the placing of asphalt pavement in several lifts. The company used sonic averaging skis and a material transfer vehicle to produce a smooth quality roadway.

 

 

TEXAS

APAC-Texas Inc., Wheeler Division, an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Cedar Park, Texas
  • Work on Draughon-Miller Central Texas Regional Airport. The project was an excellent example of how partnering and communication can solve unexpected issues. With good truck scheduling and a consistent pace of skilled construction, the company produced a pavement with excellent compaction and a smooth final ride.

 

Clark Construction of Texas Inc. of San Antonio, Texas
  • Work on Les Harrison Drive in San Antonio, Texas. The road runs through a rapidly growing area that includes a college and several large subdivisions. Clark Construction of Texas repaired some road sections, milled the pavement, and then placed a 2-inch asphalt overlay on its surface. Crews worked four long days to perform all the work and lessen the impact of construction on area residents.

 

Hunter Industries Ltd. of San Marcos, Texas
  • Work on U.S. 87 in Dewitt County. The company constructed a full-depth Perpetual Pavement, producing a road with nearly invisible transverse and longitudinal joints that will never need to be replaced.

 

Longview Asphalt Inc. of Longview, Texas
  • Work on Farm to Market 31 in Harrison County. The company placed an asphalt overlay on approximately 3 miles of the road, producing a seamless surface mat with a very smooth ride and an attractive, uniform appearance.

 

R.K. Hall Construction Ltd. of Paris, Texas
  • Work on U.S. 87 in Hartley County. The company rubblized the existing pavement then placed a 6-inch base, a 3-inch binder course and a 1.5-inch surface course to rebuild the structure. R. K. Hall Construction used 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in some project mixes to reduce the use of virgin materials.

 

 

UTAH

Staker Parson Cos. d/b/a Hales Sand & Gravel, an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Redmond, Utah
  • Widening, milling, and overlay of U.S. 89 in Sanpete County. In addition to paving the roadway with smooth asphalt pavement, the company also constructed 41 pedestrian ramps to ADA standards and built curbs and gutters.

 

 

VIRGINIA

Allan Myers of Glen Allen, Va.
  • Work on Interstates 95, 195, and 295 in Henrico County. The company milled and overlaid the roads while working around high traffic volumes with limited lane closures permitted. Allan Myers used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes to reduce the need for virgin materials.
  • Work on Interstate 295 in Henrico County. The company had to plan its milling and overlay operations carefully in order to protect workers and motorists in this high-volume traffic area. It used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into project mixes to reduce the need for virgin aggregates and binder.
  • Mill and overlay of Interstate 83 in Chesterfield County. The company was able to suggest a value engineering change to the original scope of work, saving the state more than $280,000. It also used sustainable paving practices, incorporating as much as 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes to reduce the need for virgin materials.

 

Superior Paving Corp. of Bristow, Va.
  • Work on State Route 17 in Stafford County. The project included full-depth widening, grading of the existing road, and overlay. Challenges included heavy traffic volumes, several intersections, numerous businesses along the route, a nearby fire and rescue station and the presence of overhead power lines. Despite these obstacles, Superior Paving Corp. produced a high-quality road using green paving techniques; it incorporated up to 35 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into project mixes.

 

 

WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia Paving, an Oldcastle Materials Co. of Dunbar, W.Va.
  • Work on the east and westbound lanes of Interstate 64 in Cabell County. The company repaired the road base before fine-milling the existing pavement and replacing it with a 2-inch lift of Superpave asphalt pavement. West Virginia Pavement worked at night and opened the road to traffic every morning.

 

 

WISCONSIN

Northeast Asphalt Inc. of Greenville, Wis.
  • Work on Interstate 43 in Sheboygan and Manitowoc counties. The company worked in stages to mill and overlay two road segments totaling 13.7 miles. The project also included six mainline deck overlays, bridge deck repair, construction of temporary bridge approaches, patching, median and pipe work, and traffic rerouting. Northeast Asphalt conserved natural resources by incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes.
  • Milling and paving of State Trunk Highway 32 in Calumet County. Project challenges included the first use of percent within limits (PWL) specifications and unexpected pavement repairs and elevation corrections. The company used sustainable paving practices, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mix to reduce the need for virgin materials.

 

Payne & Dolan Inc. of Waukesha, Wis.
  • Work on State Route 553 in Marquette County, Mich. The company used a specialized micro-mill head for milling to meet the Michigan Department of Transportation’s specifications for the road’s macrotexture. It then placed a ¾-inch ultrathin asphalt overlay as the surface course. Working at night due to heavy traffic congestion in the area.
  • Work on U.S. 41 in Washington County. The company milled more than 6 miles of interstate highway and overlaid it with 4 inches of hot mix asphalt. Payne & Dolan suggested changes to construction staging that provided better protection for motorists and paving crews, and reduced project costs by $800,000. The company also incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) into some asphalt mixes, reducing the need for virgin asphalt cement and for virgin aggregates.