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Schedule of Events

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Wednesday, October 11

1:00 p.m. - 1:10 p.m.

Speaker:

Marc Mastronardi, Director of Construction, Georgia DOT

1:10 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.

Performance is about meeting expectations. For a pavement to meet the needs of an owner, performance expectations must be communicated to the pavement designers, mix designers, and those building the pavements.A recent NAPA survey of pavement type decision makers found that 52% picked performance as their top priority for a new road, and another 36% picked it as their number-two priority.


Often, the word performance is associated with long-lasting, but it also encompasses smoothness, ease of maintenance, and drivability; therefore, it is important to understand just what performance means to the pavement owners contractors encounter.

 

Speaker:

Kevin Kelly, Walsh & Kelly

1:20 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

In this panel session, state and local agencies, airports, private owners, and contractors will define what performance means to them. These definitions can range from minimized rehabilitation to complex metrics that must be reported to the Federal Highway Administration. Once expectations are communicated, asphalt mixtures can be designed to ensure that performance expectations are met.

 

Panelists:

Robert Lee, TxDOT; Jesse Doyle, US Army Corps of Engineers; and Marc Mastronardi, GDOT

2:20 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

The presentation will provide an overview of FHWA’s Transportation Performance Management Legislative and Regulatory Requirements for Pavements, the National Pavement Performance Measures, Pavement Target-Setting Process and point out available resources that can be used to learn more about the pavement related performance regulations.

 

Speaker:

Luis Rodriquez, FHWA

2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

3:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

When the focus is on pavement and mixture design, sustainability is all too often an afterthought. But in many cases, choosing the environmentally best option helps lead to an improved bottom line. Learn how contractors are integrating sustainability into the everyday decision-making process to be economically competitive while also reducing their environmental footprint and improving their metrics for corporate sustainability reporting.

 

Speaker:

Dr. Adam Hand, PE, University of Nevada at Reno

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Think, Pair, Share allows participants a chance to discuss the previous presentations with their fellow participants at roundtables. Upon completion of a brief small group discussion, questions are posed to the speakers regarding additional details, misunderstandings, or implementation strategies which may aid the participants in ensuring the pavements they design and produce or own are high quality.

5:45 p.m. - 6:45 p.m.

A welcome reception will be available for all of those in attendance. This is an opportunity to network and enjoy time with other conference participants.

 

Thursday, October 12

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

8:00 a.m. - 8:40 a.m.

Pavement structural design continues to evolve. Building on design concepts developed from the AASHO Road Test, many states still rely on the AASHTO 1993 Pavement Design Guide to determine appropriate pavement thickness. Some states, however, are looking to more innovative ways to push pavement design forward, and, soon, contractors will be tasked with developing the best structural design for pavements as a part of design–build or early contractor-involvement projects. Learn what is required to complete the most common structural pavement designs today and prepare for the changes which are on the horizon.

 

Speaker:

Dr. David Timm, PE, Auburn University

8:40 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.

In 2002, the Asphalt Pavement Alliance defined the concept of perpetual pavements. In the past 15 years, numerous Perpetual Pavement Awards have been awarded to pavements which meet the criteria of perpetual pavements; however, many of these awarded pavements were not originally designed using the perpetual pavement framework. This session highlights the story of the Iowa DOT who collaborated with a local contractor to design and build a new perpetual pavement.

 

Speaker:

Dan Staebell, Regional Director, Asphalt Pavement Alliance

9:20 a.m. - 9:40 a.m.

9:40 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

Almost as important as the design strategy itself is the plan of action needed to ensure that the pavement stays in a serviceable condition. Car manufacturers will remind you to change your oil ever three to five thousand miles. Air conditioning and heating units need to be serviced every six months to keep homes at the desired temperatures. But what kind of maintenance is available for asphalt pavements. Participants will learn how Thinlays can be used to maintain service life on our transportation infrastructure. Additionally, they will understand how to choose when Thinlays are an appropriate preservation technique and when more extensive rehabilitation is needed.

 

Speaker:

Brett Williams, Director of Engineering and Technical Support, NAPA

10:20 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Life cycle cost analysis is commonly used to determine pavement type selection on major infrastructure projects. While LCCA is a commonly used tool, new guidance is needed in regards to assumptions which are used in this process. This session will highlight the best practices for LCCA and show how using real performance data can impact the results of LCCA.

 

Speaker:

Dr. Randy West, National Center for Asphalt Technology

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Think, Pair, Share allows participants a chance to discuss the previous presentations with their fellow participants at roundtables. Upon completion of a brief small group discussion, questions are posed to the speakers regarding additional details, misunderstandings, or implementation strategies which may aid the participants in ensuring the pavements they design and produce or own are high quality.

12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

When any engineered product is design, there are certain “non-negotiable” keys to ensuring the product will perform as expected. Computers are designed with enough processing power to run any expected program. Trucks are designed with enough horsepower to pull or tow the needed cargo. But what are the non-negotiables for asphalt mix design. In this session, participants will learn what are the keys to design before they start thinking about all of the “extras” like recycled materials and recycling agents.

Speaker:

Marshall Klinefelter, President, Maryland Asphalt Pavement Association

1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

When something is off-balance, the problem is immediate. Unbalanced tires, for example, provide bad fuel economy and a rough ride. The same is true for asphalt mix designs. Balanced mix design is a tool road owners are starting to use to solve durability and cracking issues without reintroducing rutting to our roadway network.

Speaker:

Shane Buchanan, PE, PhD – Oldcastle Materials

2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Speaker:

David Mensching, FHWA

2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

As mix design advances, performance tests are becoming a more critical component of the design and acceptance process. While some contractors continue to only use volumetric analyses in design, other industry representatives are using performance tests to cut costs, ensure performance, and gain confidence in mixture engineering. 

 

Speaker:

Stacy Glidden, Payne & Dolan

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.

3:20 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Most contractors and road owners use standardized mixture and pavement structure designs based on location and roadway classification. However, this conventional thinking may not optimize the cost, environmental impacts, carrying capacity, or even performance. Engineering the pavement with the right materials and mix types in the correct layers of the pavement structure allows the industry to improve pavement performance and drivability, as well as life-cycle costs and environmental impacts.

Speaker:

Kevin Hall, University of Arkansas

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.

Engineers have been focusing on using resource responsible materials to improve the environmental impact of their mixture designs, but a framework has been laid which would one day ask owners to determine the impact of the mixtures on the roadway as vehicles drive on them. Recent work in Europe has focused on developing mix designs which can reduce the rolling resistance of asphalt pavements. This session will provide a short update on how environmental mixture optimization may be standard operating procedure within the next five to ten years.

Speaker:

Richard Willis, Director of Pavement Engineering and Innovation, NAPA

4:20 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Think, Pair, Share allows participants a chance to discuss the previous presentations with their fellow participants at roundtables. Upon completion of a brief small group discussion, questions are posed to the speakers regarding additional details, misunderstandings, or implementation strategies which may aid the participants in ensuring the pavements they design and produce or own are high quality.

5:45 p.m. - 6:45 p.m.

A welcome reception will be available for all of those in attendance. This is an opportunity to network and enjoy time with other conference participants.

 

Friday October 13

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.

8:00 a.m. - 8:40 a.m.

Worldwide, more than $150 billion was spent last year on anti-aging skin-care products. But skin isn’t the only thing that ages with exposure to the environment. Engineers and chemists are making advances in recycling agents to rejuvenate aged asphalt binder in RAP and RAS. And, just like the products used on skin, not all recycling agents for aged asphalt are the same.

 

Speaker:

Grant Wollenhaupt, Superior Bowen

8:40 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.

The asphalt industry is the nation’s most consistent recycler with more than 99% of asphalt pavement reclaimed from old roads and parking lots being put to use, along with other recycled materials, in new asphalt pavement mixtures. The use of recycled materials reduces the cost and environmental impact of new pavements, but there are some concern that too much recycled material in mixtures may impact long-term performance. The experiences in the U.S. and around the world demonstrate, however, that mixtures using higher recycled contents can provide success and performance.

 

Speaker:

T.J. Young, Duval

9:20 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Change for the sake of change is pointless, but modification to improve performance can ultimately be the worth a cost increase if and only if an increase in service life is experienced. Numerous states have decided to invest in adding modifiers like polymer and recycled tire rubber in their binders and mixtures, but what kind of impact do these modifiers have? Come hear why Georgia DOT is willing to invest in these modifiers and why contractors should consider being able to provide polymer and/or rubber modified binders and mixtures.

 

Speaker:

Grover Allen, Technical Director, Blacklidge

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

10:20 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

Think, Pair, Share allows participants a chance to discuss the previous presentations with their fellow participants at roundtables. Upon completion of a brief small group discussion, questions are posed to the speakers regarding additional details, misunderstandings, or implementation strategies which may aid the participants in ensuring the pavements they design and produce or own are high quality.

11:20 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

As public-private partnerships become more common, many large-scale construction projects are going to move to design-build-maintain contracts. Recently, a 73-mile pavement of the Indiana Toll Road was redesigned and repaved. When the project was developed, the ITR Concession Company had to choose what material would be used for the pavement of choice. Come hear the story of why the 80/90 Push is now an asphalt pavement over concrete which underwent a crack and seat operation.

 

Speaker:

Zach Hurst, ITR Concession Co., LLC

11:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Speaker:

Dan Gallagher, Gallagher Asphalt (2017 NAPA Chairman)